Lìxià | David Zwirner

David Zwirner is pleased to present Lìxià, a bilingual online-only presentation in Chinese and English highlighting major works by nineteen gallery artists. The title refers to the beginning of summer on the traditional East Asian calendars, a date which coincides with the reopening of the doors of our Hong Kong gallery.


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Experience Lìxià in Chinese

Neo Rauch


尼奧·勞赫

A detail view of an oil painting on canvas by Neo Rauch, titled Abendmesse, dated 2012.

Neo Rauch, Abendmesse, 2012 (detail)
An oil painting on canvas by Neo Rauch, titled Abendmesse, dated 2012.

Neo Rauch

Abendmesse, 2012
Oil on canvas

118 1/8 x 98 3/8 inches
(300 x 250 cm)

 

SOLD

“This picture is undoubtedly one of my favorites. It flowed straight out of the brush. The painting reveals, against the backdrop of an evening city, a sequence of brightly lit stalls, with sellers standing in front of each looking for customers. Perhaps, subconsciously, Far Eastern memories slipped into the scenery; at least the rows and rows of small shopping stalls at night remind me of my experiences in Hong Kong.”

 

—Neo Rauch

Josef Albers


約瑟夫·阿爾伯斯

An oil painting on Masonite by Josef Albers, titled Homage to the Square, dated 1972.

Josef Albers, Homage to the Square, 1972 (detail)
Installation view of the exhibition, Josef Albers in Mexico, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, dated 2017-2018.
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017–2018
Installation view, Josef Albers in Mexico, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2017–2018
An oil painting on Masonite by Josef Albers, titled Homage to the Square, dated 1972.

Josef Albers

Homage to the Square, 1972
Oil on Masonite

16 x 16 inches
(40.6 x 40.6 cm)

 

SOLD

“Each [Homage work] has its own inner light, scale and spatial rhythm; together they attest to the instability of color and perception.”


The New York Times

“The perception of color is deceiving. We may perceive two different colors to look alike, or two equal colors to look different. This game of colors—the change of identity—is the object of my study.”


—Josef Albers

Harold Ancart


哈羅德·安卡特

A detail view of an untitled oil stick and pencil painting on canvas in artist's frame by Harold Ancart, dated 2019.

Harold Ancart, Untitled, 2019 (detail)
An untitled oil stick and pencil painting on canvas in artist's frame by Harold Ancart, dated 2019.

Harold Ancart

Untitled, 2019
Oil stick and pencil on canvas in artist's frame

113 x 80 7/8 inches
(287 x 205.4 cm)

 

SOLD

“There’s undeniably something raw and rugged about [his paintings], in the way Ancart uses oil sticks to fill every inch of canvas with densely worked color....They seem sophisticated, knowing....They invoke the history of the medium, particularly those high-modernist concerns regarding flatness, surface and abstraction.”


ArtReview

Installation view of a special presentation of works by Harold Ancart at the David Zwirner booth at Frieze New York, dated 2019.
Installation view, special presentation of works by Harold Ancart, David Zwirner booth, Frieze New York, 2019
Installation view, special presentation of works by Harold Ancart, David Zwirner booth, Frieze New York, 2019

Yayoi Kusama


草間彌生

A sculpture by Yayoi Kusama, titled, Pumpkin (1994), installed in Naoshima, Japan

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994. Installation view, Naoshima, Japan
A detail view of a mirror polished bronze, dye, and acrylic lacquer sculpture by Yayoi Kusama, titled Pumpkin (M), dated 2016.
Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin (M), 2016 (detail)
Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin (M), 2016 (detail)
A detail view of a mirror polished bronze, dye, and acrylic lacquer sculpture by Yayoi Kusama, titled Pumpkin (M), dated 2016.
Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin (M), 2016 (detail)
Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin (M), 2016 (detail)
A detail view of a mirror polished bronze, dye, and acrylic lacquer sculpture by Yayoi Kusama, titled Pumpkin (M), dated 2016.
Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin (M), 2016 (detail)
Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin (M), 2016 (detail)

“Pumpkins have been a great comfort to me since my childhood; they speak to me of the joy of living. They are humble and amusing at the same time, and I have and always will celebrate them in my art.”


—Yayoi Kusama

A mirror polished bronze, dye, and acrylic lacquer sculpture by Yayoi Kusama, titled Pumpkin (M), dated 2016.

Yayoi Kusama

Pumpkin (M), 2016
Mirror polished bronze, dye, and acrylic lacquer

41 3/8 x 35 3/8 x 35 3/8 inches
(105 x 90 x 90 cm)

 

SOLD

While pumpkin shapes have appeared in Yayoi Kusama’s work since her early art studies in Japan in the 1950s, this organic form gained a central importance in her oeuvre from the late 1980s onward. The present work is part of a series of pumpkin sculptures made in bronze, the first time the artist has worked with the material on this scale.

Giorgio Morandi


喬治·莫蘭迪

Detail view of an oil painting on canvas by Giorgio Morandi, titled Natura morta (Still Life), dated 1957.

Giorgio Morandi, Natura morta (Still Life), 1957 (detail)
Installation view of the exhibition, Giorgio Morandi, at David Zwirner, New York, dated 2015.
Installation view, Giorgio Morandi, David Zwirner, New York, 2015
Installation view, Giorgio Morandi, David Zwirner, New York, 2015
An oil painting on canvas by Giorgio Morandi, titled Natura morta (Still Life), dated 1957.

Giorgio Morandi

Natura morta (Still Life), 1957
Oil on canvas
10 1/4 x 14 inches
(26 x 35.6 cm)
Framed: 14 x 17 3/4 inches
(35.6 x 45.1 cm)
On Reserve

“Morandi’s stagings of his repertory company of nondescript bottles, vases, pitchers, and whatnot are definitive twentieth-century art works. They breathe intimacy with the past—Piero della Francesca, Chardin—and address a future that still glimmers, just out of reach. They remain unbeatably radical meditations on what can and can’t happen when three dimensions are transposed into two.”


The New Yorker

Yun Hyong-keun


尹亨根

A detail of an oil painting on linen by Yun Hyong-keun, titled Umber-Blue, dated 1981.

Yun Hyong-keun, Umber-Blue, 1981 (detail)
An oil painting on linen by Yun Hyong-keun, titled Umber-Blue, dated 1981.

Yun Hyong-keun

Umber-Blue, 1981
Oil on linen
110 1/2 x 71 inches
(280.7 x 180.3 cm)
$650,000

“Nature, however you look at it, is always unadorned, fresh, and beautiful. I wonder if my paintings could capture the beauty of nature. No, it would be impossible. Even so, I want to make paintings that, like nature, one never tires of looking at.”

 

—Yun Hyong-keun

“Somewhere between geometry and gesture, the ‘Umber Blue’ series are remarkable for their brevity and solemn beauty. The paintings recall both traditional Chinese ink painting and Modernist abstraction. Whilst never abandoning haptic pleasures, the images produced also seduce the eye.”


The Brooklyn Rail

Installation view of the exhibition, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, at Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, dated 2019
Installation view, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, 2019
Installation view, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, 2019
Installation view of the exhibition, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, at Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, dated 2019
Installation view, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, 2019
Installation view, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, 2019
Installation view of the exhibition, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, at Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, dated 2019
Installation view, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, 2019
Installation view, Yun Hyong-keun: A retrospective, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, 2019

Mamma Andersson


瑪瑪·安德森

An installation view of the exhibition, Mamma Andersson: The Lost Paradise, at David Zwirner, New York, dated 2020.

Installation view, Mamma Andersson: The Lost Paradise,
David Zwirner, New York, 2020
An oil and acrylic panting on canvas by Mamma Andersson, titled The Lost Paradise III, dated 2020.

Mamma Andersson

The Lost Paradise III, 2020
Oil and acrylic on canvas
41 1/2 x 31 5/8 inches
(105.4 x 80.3 cm)
$350,000

“Myriad fragmentary narratives pervade Andersson’s work, which integrates various dichotomies—past and present, outdoors and indoors, roughness and delicacy—to spellbinding effect. Residue, traces, and shadows; quiet dramas intriguingly suggested but never fully revealed.”


—Artforum

“Everything boils down to a memory, the perception of a memory, and how to displace a memory.”

 

—Mamma Andersson

Noah Davis


諾亞·戴維斯

Detail of an oil painting on canvas by Noah Davis, titled Untitled (Man In a Top Hat and Blue Background), dated 2010.

Noah Davis, Untitled (Man in a Top Hat and Blue Background), 2010 (detail)
An oil painting on canvas by Noah Davis, titled Untitled (Man In a Top Hat and Blue Background), dated 2010.

Noah Davis

Untitled (Man in a Top Hat and Blue Background), 2010
Oil on canvas
6 x 6 inches
(15.2 x 15.2 cm)
$85,000 On Reserve

“Davis accomplished one of the most moving, effective fusions of paint handling, narrative and symbolism in recent American art. Ostensibly traditional but actually unbelievably subtle and rich, the paintings make everything count, from the gestures and expressions of their subjects to tiny touches of color. Davis’s goal was to show African-Americans in ‘normal scenarios.’ He did this, and more, creating images that speak to the human condition.”


The New York Times

“I feel there is immense freedom in painting to create your own universe—if you don’t let ‘Art History’ or pretense get in the way.”


—Noah Davis

Alice Neel


愛麗絲·尼爾

Detail of an oil painting on canvas by Alice Neel, titled Takahara Shindu, dated 1969.

Alice Neel, Takahara Shindu, 1969 (detail)
An oil painting on canvas by Alice Neel, titled Takahara Shindu, dated 1969.

Alice Neel

Takahara Shindu, 1969
Oil on canvas
40 x 30 inches
(101.6 x 76.2 cm)
$750,000

“I told the truth the best I was able. I think that the best art is the art that makes the truest statement of when it was existing, both aesthetic, and political, and everything.”

 

—Alice Neel

Installation view of the exhibition, Alice Neel, Uptown, at David Zwirner, New York, dated 2017.
Installation view, Alice Neel, Uptown, David Zwirner, New York, 2017
Installation view, Alice Neel, Uptown, David Zwirner, New York, 2017

Suzan Frecon


蘇珊·弗雷孔

A painting by Suzan Frecon titled, version 13 (2010), on view at The Menil Collection, Houston.

Suzan Frecon, version 13, 2010. Installation view, The Menil Collection, Houston
An oil painting on linen by Suzan Frecon, titled iron, gold, dated 2019.

Suzan Frecon

iron, gold, 2019
Oil on linen

Overall: 87 3/8 x 108 inches
(221.9 x 274.3 cm)
Panel, each: 87 3/8 x 54 inches
(221.9 x 137.2 cm)

 

SOLD

“In her painting, Frecon engages with color and texture, the intersection of vision and the material world, particularly as it is manifested in oil paint. It is a finely attuned openness to the world that we encounter in Frecon’s work, a sense of color unlike anyone else’s. Can we let go of words and just look? Can we live in silence long enough to begin seeing what is in front of our eyes?”


Hyperallergic

“I don’t paint paintings of something. The painting is the explanation….I try to get beyond that, to a higher plane of abstraction where the painting is its own strength.”


—Suzan Frecon

Josh Smith


約什·史密斯

A detail view of an untitled oil painting on linen by Josh Smith, dated 2019.

Josh Smith, Untitled, 2019 (detail)

“[Josh Smith] is a passionate cynic, an artist who degrades and celebrates his medium through the relentless yet fervent repetition of a selected motif....This automatism opens the door to incessant variations in brushwork, background and, above all, color—as well as our consideration of [the] same.”


The New York Times

An untitled oil painting on linen by Josh Smith, dated 2019.

Josh Smith

Untitled, 2019
Oil on linen

84 x 72 inches
(213.4 x 182.9 cm)

 

SOLD

“I make a piece of art just to prove that I exist in my own way. And I can’t make something nice. I have to make something that makes me uncomfortable.”


—Josh Smith

Installation view of the exhibition, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, at David Zwirner, New York, dated 2019.
Installation view, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, David Zwirner, New York, 2019
Installation view, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, David Zwirner, New York, 2019
Installation view of the exhibition, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, at David Zwirner, New York, dated 2019.
Installation view, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, David Zwirner, New York, 2019
Installation view, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, David Zwirner, New York, 2019
Installation view of the exhibition, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, at David Zwirner, New York, dated 2019.
Installation view, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, David Zwirner, New York, 2019
Installation view, Josh Smith: Emo Jungle, David Zwirner, New York, 2019

Oscar Murillo


奧斯卡·穆里略

An installation view of the exhibition, Turner Prize 2019: Oscar Murillo, Turner Contemporary, in Margate, England, dated 2019-2020.

Installation view, Turner Prize 2019: Oscar Murillo, Turner Contemporary, Margate, England, 2019–2020
A mixed media painting on canvas and linen by Oscar Murillo, titled (untitled) surge, dated 2017 through 2018.

Oscar Murillo

untitled (surge), 2017-2018
Oil and oil stick on canvas and linen

70 7/8 x 92 1/2 inches
(180 x 235 cm)

 

SOLD

“[I’m] thinking about mark-making and crystalizing mark-making in relation to my energy…to my own anxiety as an individual. And how I can tweak that, calibrate it, and make sure that how I make paintings is not simply an exercise but how does it enter into a dialogue with a canon, a Western canon of making painting.”

 

—Oscar Murillo

“...[Murilllo’s] vibrant, clever paintings spoke of cultural dislocation, using a bold range of techniques—montage, wordplay, abstract expressionism.”


Financial Times

Barbara Kruger


芭芭拉·克魯格

Detail of an archival pigment print by Barbara Kruger, titled Untitled (It's New, It's You), dated 2014.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (It's New, It's You), 2014 (detail) 
Courtesy David Zwirner and Sprüth Magers

An archival pigment print by Barbara Kruger, titled Untitled (It's New, It's You), dated 2014.

Barbara Kruger

Untitled (It's New, It's You), 2014
Archival pigment print

49 x 56 inches (framed)
(121.9 x 139.7 cm)
Edition of 10, 3 AP
Courtesy David Zwirner and Sprüth Magers

 

SOLD

“I am interested in working with pictures and words, because I think they have the power to tell us who we are and who we aren’t, who we can be and who we can never be.”

 

—Barbara Kruger

 

All proceeds from the sale of Barbara Kruger's Untitled (It's New, It's You), 2014, will be donated by the artist to The Kitchen, a multidisciplinary space in New York City, as part of the nonprofit organization’s 50th Anniversary Benefit. Presented in cooperation with Sprüth Magers.

Installation view of the exhibition, Barbara Kruger: Forever, at Amorepacific Museum of Art, Seoul, dated 2019.
Installation view, Barbara Kruger: Forever, Amorepacific Museum of Art, Seoul, 2019
Installation view, Barbara Kruger: Forever, Amorepacific Museum of Art, Seoul, 2019

Michaël Borremans


米凱爾·博伊曼斯

A photo by James Murrell of Michael Borreman's studio.

Michaël Borremans’s studio, 2011. Photo: James Merrell.
An oil painting on canvas by Michael Borremans, titled The Bodies 3, dated 2005.

Michaël Borremans

The Bodies 3, 2005
Oil on canvas
27 1/2 x 43 1/4 inches
(69.9 x 109.9 cm)
On Reserve

“The archetypal Borremans painting is a seductive enigma, a bouillabaisse of specificity, obscurity, anxiety, humor and great technique.”


ArtReview

Installation view of the exhibition, Convex/Concave: Belgian Contemporary Art, at TANK Shanghai, 2019-2020.
Installation view, Convex/Concave: Belgian Contemporary Art, TANK Shanghai, 2019-2020.
Courtesy the artist, TANK Shanghai, and WIELS.
Installation view, Convex/Concave: Belgian Contemporary Art, TANK Shanghai, 2019-2020.
Courtesy the artist, TANK Shanghai, and WIELS.

“My work always tends to capture an intensity; it has a quiet and meditative quality. I feel the roots of such traits are embedded in aspects of many Asian cultures.”

 

—Michaël Borremans

Lucas Arruda


盧卡斯·阿魯達

A photograph of Lucas Arruda's studio by Jason Schmidt, dated 2019.

Lucas Arruda's studio, 2020. Photo: Jason Schmidt. Courtesy the artist, Mendes Wood DM, São Paulo/Brussels/New York, and David Zwirner
An oil painting on canvas by Lucas Arruda, titled Untitled (from the Deserto-Modelo series), dated 2017.

Lucas Arruda

Untitled (from the Deserto-Modelo series), 2017
Oil on canvas
11 3/4 x 13 3/8 inches
(30 x 34 cm)
On Reserve

“The only reason to call my works landscapes is cultural—it’s simply that viewers automatically register my format as a landscape, although none of the images can be traced to a geographic location. It's the idea of landscape as a structure, rather than a real place.”


—Lucas Arruda

“Working along the border between abstraction and representation…, [Arruda] is, it seems, genuinely compelled by the idea of capturing lived experience in paint. Part of that is being metaphorically on the outer fringe of civilization and peering into the unknown and perhaps unknowable cosmos. It is the thrill of the sublime.”

 

The New York Times

Installation view of the exhibition, Lucas Arruda: Deserto-Modelo, at Fridericianum, Kassel, Germany, dated 2019.
Installation view, Lucas Arruda: Deserto-Modelo, Fridericianum, Kassel, Germany, 2019
Installation view, Lucas Arruda: Deserto-Modelo, Fridericianum, Kassel, Germany, 2019

Isa Genzken


伊薩·根澤肯

Detail view of a mixed media wall-hanging sculpture by Isa Genkzken, titled Dedicated to Jasper Johns, dated 2009.

Isa Genkzen, Dedicated to Jasper Johns, 2009 (detail)
A mixed media wall-hanging sculpture by Isa Genkzken, titled Dedicated to Jasper Johns, dated 2009.

Isa Genzken

Dedicated to Jasper Johns, 2009
Plastic foil, spray paint, fabric, color prints, and stickers
120 1/8 x 133 7/8 inches
(305 x 340 cm)
$320,000

“Most often, the objects chosen for Genzken’s assemblages are themselves reproductions of meaningful elements in the world….Sometimes slightly embellished by Genzken, with a swath of paint or a strip of fabric, these elements still retain their connection to their real-world identities and, most importantly, their real-world meanings, both literal and symbolic.”


—Laura Hoptman, Isa Genzken, MoMA exhibition catalogue

Installation view of the exhibition, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, dated 2013-2014.
Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2013–2014
Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2013–2014

Luc Tuymans


呂克·圖伊曼斯

Detail of an oil painting on canvas by Luc Tuymans, titled Allo! II, dated 2012.

Luc Tuymans, Allo! II, 2012 (detail)
An oil painting on canvas by Luc Tuymans, titled Allo! II, dated 2012.

Luc Tuymans

Allo! II, 2012
Oil on canvas

51 3/8 x 71 1/4 inches 
(130.3 x 181 cm)

 

SOLD

“Luc Tuymans’s main contribution to contemporary art in the last twenty years has been his rethinking of the symbolic and narrative possibilities of figurative painting and the imagery in which it is grounded....Tuymans’s approach shows one possible avenue for making new kinds of meaning out of a technical vocabulary that many artists may have considered orthodox or even powerless. We see this trend toward overdetermined narratives in the work of many Chinese artists of his generation....And we see it mirrored in a younger generation of artists...for whom this kind of conceptual approach has opened up new possibilities off of the canvas.”


—Philip Tinari, Director and CEO, UCCA

Installation view of the exhibition, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, at Palazzo Grassi, Venice, dated 2019-2020.
Installation view, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2019–2020
Installation view, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2019–2020
Installation view of the exhibition, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, at Palazzo Grassi, Venice, dated 2019-2020.
Installation view, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2019-2020
Installation view, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2019-2020
Installation view of the exhibition, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, at Palazzo Grassi, Venice, dated 2019-2020.
Installation view, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2019-2020
Installation view, Luc Tuymans: La Pelle, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2019-2020

Lisa Yuskavage


麗莎·約斯卡瓦吉

A detail of an oil painting on linen by Lisa Yuskavage, titled Hearth, dated 2020.

Lisa Yuskavage, Hearth, 2020 (detail)
An oil painting on linen by Lisa Yuskavage, titled Hearth, dated 2020.

Lisa Yuskavage

Hearth, 2020
Oil on linen

55 x 65 inches
(139.7 x 167.6 cm)

 

SOLD

“I painted Hearth using very thin washes of oil paint and wiped some of the paint away as if it were a monoprint or a watercolor. The fire is more densely painted. I was exploring a way to combine many contrasts: thick and thin, bright and dark, as a way of heightening the drama.”


—Lisa Yuskavage

“Yuskavage, a masterful colorist, makes lush, luminous, intentionally—and delightfully—gauche paintings that unsettle facile notions of misogyny, femininity and the female gaze.”

 

T Magazine

Installation view of the exhibition, Lisa Yuskavage: Wilderness, at Aspen Art Museum, Colorado, dated 2020.
Installation view, Lisa Yuskavage: Wilderness, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado, 2020
Installation view, Lisa Yuskavage: Wilderness, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado, 2020

Wolfgang Tillmans


沃爾夫岡·提爾曼斯

A detail of a photograph by Wolfgang Tillmans, titled Shaker rainbow, dated 1998.

Wolfgang Tillmans, Shaker rainbow, 1998 (detail)

“I trust that, if I study something carefully enough, a greater essence or truth might be revealed without having a prescribed meaning… What connects all my work is finding the right balance between intention and chance, doing as much as I can and knowing when to let go, allowing fluidity and avoiding anything being forced.”

—Wolfgang Tillmans

Installation view of the exhibition, Wolfgang Tillmans, at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2017.
Installation view, Wolfgang Tillmans, Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2017
Installation view, Wolfgang Tillmans, Fondation Beyeler, Basel, 2017
A photograph by Wolfgang Tillmans, titled Shaker rainbow, dated 1998.

Wolfgang Tillmans

Shaker rainbow, 1998
Inkjet print on paper, clips
136 7/8 x 91 3/4 inches
(347.9 x 233 cm)
$200,000

"Tillmans has photographed the Shaker community several times now, returning to them as he has with other forms of community. Indeed, it is a community that—for all their differences—shares a great deal with those whom we might more readily associate Tillmans with, the groups of musicians and clubbers who come together in New York, London, or Berlin.”


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