People Who Work There | David Zwirner
A photograph of the front door of cfcp, New York. dated 2019.

People Who Work There

The iconic American artist Sol LeWitt once worked at the book counter of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in the 1960s. It was there that he met his coworkers Dan Flavin and Lucy Lippard, and where Jeff Koons would begin working the ticket booth in the following decade. To fund his early art practice, Richard Serra started an art installation and furniture-moving business, working with assistant Philip Glass. And gallerist Betty Parsons, once best known for her promotion of abstract expressionism, has been rediscovered as a talented painter in her own right. Many artists who have worked within museums and arts institutions have gone on to make art history.

Held at David Zwirner in 2012 and 2016, the exhibition series People Who Work Here was dedicated to showcasing works by artists who also work at the gallery. Inspired by this tradition, Mary Howard and Alec Smyth, both members of David

Zwirner’s sales team, have organized an exhibition titled People Who Work There at the second-floor Brooklyn gallery cfcp. The exhibition features works by twenty-eight artists who are currently on staff at David Zwirner.

People Who Work There brings together multifaceted works across a vast range of media, including drawing, photography, printmaking, video, painting, sculpture, and installation. David Zwirner’s latest Online Viewing Room is presented in conjunction with People Who Work There. This online exhibition features a selection of available works by artists who work in various departments at the gallery, including sales, press, finance, and operations. A number of works shown here are also on view in the exhibition at cfcp.

All proceeds from this Viewing Room directly benefit the artists and cfcp.

Inquire about works from this Viewing Room
A painting by Katherine Page, titled Transmission Tower, dated 2014

Katherine Page

Transmission Tower, 2014
Oil on canvas
60 x 36 inches (152.4 x 91.4 cm)
An installation by Jay Pluck, titled untitled, hand-painted wallpaper installation, dated 2019

Jay Pluck

untitled, hand-painted wallpaper installation, 2019
Acrylic, gouache, ink, and wheat paste on paper

Installation dimensions variable

An installation view of the exhibition People Who Work There, dated 2019
Installation view, People Who Work There, cfcp, New York, 2019. Photo courtesy of Object Studies
Installation view, People Who Work There, cfcp, New York, 2019. Photo courtesy of Object Studies
A sculpture by Clive Murphy, titled Inflatable Cardboard Box (After Raymond Pettibon), dated 2018-2019

Clive Murphy

Inflatable Cardboard Box (After Raymond Pettibon), 2018-2019
Deconstructed cardboard, vinyl, wood, rubber valve, and air
18 3/4 x 19 1/4 x 12 3/8 inches (47.6 x 48.9 x 31.4 cm)
A painting by Rebecca Holmberg, titled 2 girls 1 cup, dated 2016

Rebecca Holmberg

2 girls 1 cup, 2016
Oil on canvas
37 x 37 inches (94 x 94 cm)
A work on paper by Erika Anderson, titled Study for August 12th, dated 2019

Erika Anderson

Study for August 12th, 2019
Watercolor on paper
6 x 8 inches (15.2 x 20.3 cm)
A painting by Sean Micka, dated 2017

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138 JAGUAR E-TYPE SERIES I 4.2-LITRE ROADSTER, 1966, Chassis no. 1E11911. Engine no. 7E6555-9. Body no. 4E3351. As per Enzo Ferrari, ""The most beautiful car ever made"". One of the finest examples extant. Three-time 100-point JCNA National Champion. Matching numbers. “The body’s subtle, swelling curves and depressions reflect carefully calculated geometries based on the ellipse. The most prominent feature—the long, projecting hood—is modeled with a distinctive ‘power bulge’ that runs down the hood’s center to accommodate the powerful engine. Louvered air-intake panels penetrate the otherwise smooth surface. The hood curves down to a grille-less nose that sucks in air to cool the engine. The gently swelling fenders terminate in glass cowl headlights that are seamlessly encapsulated into the body. The view of the car’s contours is as compelling to the driver as to the passerby.” These are the words that the Museum of Modern Art in New York City uses to describe one of its larger acquisitions. The sculpture is described as having a “steel body: 47” x 64½” x 14′ 7½””It is a Jaguar E-Type Roadster that has been credited to Sir William Lyons, Malcolm Sayer, and William M. Heynes. Estimate $225,000 — 325,000. Art of the Automobile, SOTHEBY'S, New York, November 21, 2013. Sale Code: N09045, 2017
Oil on canvas
48 x 72 inches (121.9 x 182.9 cm)
An installation view of the exhibition People Who Work There, dated 2019
Installation view, People Who Work There, cfcp, New York, 2019. Photo courtesy of Object Studies
Installation view, People Who Work There, cfcp, New York, 2019. Photo courtesy of Object Studies

“Sean Micka’s photorealistic paintings are based on print auction catalogue photographs, mainly from Christie’s and Sotheby’s, of fine antiques, jewelry, and luxury items. They depict spoons, ladles, diamonds, emeralds, furniture, timepieces, and automobiles. Painted with high fidelity to realism, Micka’s paintings become aesthetic objects of labor themselves, mapping out a paradoxical connection to the functions of authorship, and practices of collecting artifacts. They are close reproductions, or appropriations, of ready-made images.”

 

— Mary Howard

A painting by Jonathan Rodriguez, titled Backstage Drama, dated 2018

Jonathan Rodriguez

Backstage Drama, 2018
Oil on canvas
60 x 70 inches (152.4 x 177.8 cm)
A sculpture by Kyle Combs, titled Ganglia[09016058], dated 2018

Kyle Combs

Ganglia[09016058], 2018
3D-Printed PLA Plastic
13 1/4 x 13 x 11 inches (33.7 x 33 x 27.9 cm)

“Kyle Combs is one of the art handlers at the gallery. He typically works in audio, however this is one of the first sculptures that he's made. It's a 3D printed plastic, computer-generated algorithm that is self-perpetuating. Using a custom code, he generates auto-poietic, emergent forms.”

 

— Mary Howard

A painting by Kevin Mosca, titled The healing touch of a garment, dated 2018

Kevin Mosca

The healing touch of a garment, 2018
Oil on canvas
22 1/4 x 17 inches (56.5 x 43.2 cm)
A print by Leslie Antell titled untitled (atmosphere), dated 2016

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untitled (atmosphere), 2016
Inkjet print on paper

Image: 14 3/8 x 11 1/4 inches (36.5 x 28.6 cm) Print: 16 5/8 x 11 3/4 inches (42.2 x 29.8 cm)

“Julian Louis Philips’ video, our mothers raised wolves but they saw dogs, takes footage from the 2018 US Tennis Open, and combines it with audio and video from various other times when black women were ridiculed or silenced while being placed in the media spotlight. Voices that are heard include Fannie Lou Hamer and Anita Hill. The music is Summertime by George Gershwin played at various speeds. The juxtaposition of time, sound, and imagery depicts the persistence of negative attitudes towards the black female voice.”

 

—Mary Howard

A still from a video by Julian Luis Phillips, titled our mothers raised wolves, and they saw dogs, dated 2019

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our mothers raised wolves, and they saw dogs, 2019
Single channel video, 5:17 min

Overall dimensions vary with installation

A print by Joanna Fiorentino, titled Untitled (Simone), dated 2018

Joanna Fiorentino

Untitled (Simone) , 2018
Linocut on paper
12 x 15 1/2 inches (30.5 x 39.4 cm)
A painting by Spike Blake, titled Pumpkin

Spike Blake

Pumpkin, 2018
Oil on birch plywood
7 1/8 x 7 1/8 inches (18 x 18 cm)
A print by Danny Greenberg, titled Netting, dated 2014

Danny Greenberg

Netting, 2014
Intaglio monoprint with embossment on paper

12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm) Framed: 15 1/8 x 12 1/4 x 7/8 inches (38.4 x 31.1 x 2.2 cm)

An installation by Joel Fennell, titled TBD, dated 2019

Joel Fennell

Untitled (to Ilhan Omar), 2019
Two (2) black light UV LED strips, two (2) transformers, snow camouflage netting, two (2) nails, polyester fabric, and wood stretcher
125 x 68 3/4 inches (317.5 x 174.6 cm)
A photograph featuring co-curators Mary Howard and Alec Smyth
People Who Work There co-curators Mary Howard, left, and Alec Smyth, right, cfcp, New York. Photo by Virginia Stroh
People Who Work There co-curators Mary Howard, left, and Alec Smyth, right, cfcp, New York. Photo by Virginia Stroh
A photograph featuring co-curators Mary Howard and Alec Smyth
People Who Work There co-curators Mary Howard, left, and Alec Smyth, right, cfcp, New York. Photo by Virginia Stroh
People Who Work There co-curators Mary Howard, left, and Alec Smyth, right, cfcp, New York. Photo by Virginia Stroh

“This exhibition provided an opportunity for all of us to engage with each other outside the bounds of our everyday work life. It’s special to work in a company of over 200 employees, so many of whom are committed practicing artists. Putting this together felt like sort of an obvious thing to do, and as such it came together quite easily and beautifully.” — Alec Smyth

A print by Liam Richardson, titled Folly, dated 2018

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Folly, 2018
Screenprint on paper

16 1/2 x 11 5/8 inches (41.9 x 29.5 cm)

A work on paper by Heather Jeremy, titled Penny for your thoughts, dated 2017

Heather Jeremy

Penny for your thoughts, 2017
Oil pastel and ink on paper
14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)

“Rhys Ziemba is an art handler at David Zwirner. This series, which he has been working on for several years in the basement of his studio, often includes things like traffic cones, paint buckets, cardboard boxes or colorful, abstract tarp. The work featured in this Online Viewing Room includes a pink flamingo, which is another object that he has been painting recently. He brings banal objects from work, or from the street and brings them to the studio to arrange them in different formations, bringing life to them in that process.”

 

— Alec Smyth

A work on Paper by Le Dai, titled a man and his dog 一个人和他的狗

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a man and his dog 一个人和他的狗, 2015
Watercolor on paper
15 x 13 inches (38.1 x 33 cm)
A painting by Rhys Ziemba, titled 17 Messidor CCXXVII, dated 2019

17 Messidor CCXXVII, 2019
Oil on masonite
20 x 16 inches (50.8 x 40.6 cm)
A mixed media work by Haley Parsa, titled Half Seen, dated 2018

Haley Darya Parsa

Half Seen, 2018
Oil and photo transfer on canvas
48 1/8 x 30 1/8 inches (122.2 x 76.5 cm)
A photograph by Kim Davidson, titled Untitled, dated 2018

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Untitled, 2018
Inkjet print on rag paper

Image: 38 1/2 x 58 inches (97.8 x 147.3 cm)
Print: 40 x 60 1/4 inches (101.6 x 153 cm)

A work on paper by Alessandra Pearson, titled Interstitial, dated 2019.

Alessandra Pearson

Interstitial, 2017
Ink on paper
12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm)
A painting by Ali rossi, titled BPC, dated 2018

Ali Rossi

BPC, 2018
Oil and oil stick on wood panel
60 x 17 1/8 inches (152.4 x 43.5 cm)
A photograph of the opening reception for People Who Work There at cfcp
Attendees at the opening reception for People Who Work There, cfcp, New York. Photograph by Emma Macdonald
Attendees at the opening reception for People Who Work There, cfcp, New York. Photograph by Emma Macdonald
A photograph of the opening reception for People Who Work There at cfcp
Attendees at the opening reception for People Who Work There, cfcp, New York. Photograph by Emma Macdonald
Attendees at the opening reception for People Who Work There, cfcp, New York. Photograph by Emma Macdonald

“The process of organizing the show was especially exciting because of the diversity of work that our colleagues are making. It ended up being a very interesting show to hang for that reason, and connections between practices were revealed which we didn’t initially see.”
—Mary Howard

A painting by Christopher Dunlap, titled RVR 002, dated 2018

Christopher Dunlap

RVR 002, 2018
Oil on canvas
24 1/8 x 18 inches (61.3 x 45.7 cm)
A print by Jackie Furtado, titled i was carrying myself, dated 2017

Jackie Furtado

i was carrying myself, 2017
Inkjet print on Sintra in artist's maple frame
Print: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches (27.3 x 34.9 cm)
Framed: 11 1/2 x 14 1/2 x 1 1/4 inches (29.2 x 36.8 x 3.2 cm)
Portrait featuring artists exhibited in People Who Work There.
Portrait featuring artists exhibited in People Who Work There, New York. Photo by Virginia Stroh
Portrait featuring artists exhibited in People Who Work There, New York. Photo by Virginia Stroh
A painting by Lindsay Basile, titled Untitled (Summer 2018), dated 2018

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Untitled (Summer 2018) , 2018
Oil on wood panel
12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm)
A painting by David McBride, titled Untitled (Ordinary Flowers), dated 2019

David McBride

Untitled (Ordinary Flowers) , 2019
Oil on MDF panel
23 x 19 1/8 inches (58.4 x 48.6 cm)

Visit The People Who Work There at cfcp through August 4 by appointment only.

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