David Zwirner is pleased to present This Is Not a Prop at the gallery’s 525 and 533 West 19th Street locations in New York. The exhibition includes work by Alex Da Corte, Jonathas de Andrade, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jonah Groeneboer, Gordon Hall, Hannah Levy, Donald Moffett, Paulo Nazareth, Elle Pérez, Oren Pinhassi, Christina Quarles, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Wolfgang Tillmans, and Franz West.

 

This Is Not a Prop brings together a multigenerational group of artists whose work explores the liminal space between body and object. The exhibition takes as its point of departure Franz West’s (1947–2012) furniture and Passstücke (Adaptives), which are represented in the show by three works: Paravent (Passstück) (Screen [Adaptive]) (c. 1982); 2625 (1991/1999); and Passstücke (mit Video mit Verwendungstipps) (Adaptives [with Video with Usage Tips]) (1996). Intended to be interacted with, these works redefine art as a social experience and ask how objects can function both as physical extensions of the body and as representations of the human experience.

 

This Is Not a Prop is organized by Alec Smyth and Cristina Vere Nicoll.

 

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Image: Viewers interacting with Franz West, Passstücke (mit Video mit Verwendungstips) (Adaptives [with Video with Usage Tips]), 1996, during the exhibition Franz West at David Zwirner, New York, 2014. © 2018 Archiv Franz West

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Alex Da Corte
Slow Graffiti (still), 2017
Single channel video projection, 13:00 min, color, stereo
Dimensions variable with installation
Hannah Levy
Untitled (detail), 2018
Nickel plated steel, silicone, and polyurethane
26 7/8 x 70 7/8 x 33 1/8 inches (68.5 x 180 x 84 cm)
Paulo Nazareth
Sem título (detail), 2011
Inkjet print on paper
8 5/8 x 11 3/8 inches (22 x 29 cm)
Jonathas de Andrade
Menosprezo / Belittle, por Oristes (installation view), 2017
Gordon Hall
Brothers and Sisters, 2018
Cast pigmented concrete, hand-dyed cotton, wood, hand-glazed tile mosaic, colored pencil, brick, and mortar
Dimensions variable with installation
Oren Pinhassi
Untitled (urinal #1)Untitled (urinal #2), 2018
Cement, burlap, glass, and metal mesh
Each: 58 x 20 x 45 inches (147.3 x 50.8 x 114.3 cm)
Elle Pérez
Binder, 2015
Archival pigment print
44 3/8 x 31 inches (112.7 x 78.7 cm)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya
Mirror Study (_Q5A2063), 2016
Archival pigment print
13 3/8 x 10 inches (34 x 25.4 cm)
Location 
Opening reception 
Wednesday, June 27 6–8 PM

The concurrent exhibition Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Nets is on view at 34 East 69th Street on the Upper East Side through December 22, 2017.

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present two major concurrent exhibitions of recent work by Yayoi Kusama on view across three gallery spaces in New York: Festival of Life at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in Chelsea and Infinity Nets at the recently opened space on 34 East 69th Street on the Upper East Side. The exhibitions will feature sixty-six paintings from her iconic My Eternal Soul series, new large-scale flower sculptures, a polka-dotted environment, and two Infinity Mirror Rooms in the Chelsea locations, and a selection of new Infinity Nets paintings uptown. 

 

Kusama’s work has transcended some of the most important art movements of the second half of the twentieth century, including Pop art and Minimalism. Born in 1929 in Matsumoto, Japan, she briefly studied painting in Kyoto before moving to New York City in the late 1950s. She began her large-scale infinity net paintings during this decade, and went on to apply their obsessive, hallucinatory qualities to three-dimensional work. In a unique style that is both sensory and utopian, Kusama’s work—which spans paintings, performances, room-size presentations, sculptural installations, literary works, films, fashion, design, and interventions within existing architectural structures—possesses a highly personal character, yet one that has connected profoundly with large audiences around the globe. Throughout her career she has been able to break down traditional barriers between work, artist, and spectator.

 

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Yayoi Kusama
MY SOUL IS WANDERING, 2013
Acrylic on canvas
76 3/8 x 76 3/8 inches (194 x 194 cm)
Yayoi Kusama
CLOUDS ARE CONSIDERING, 2013
Acrylic on canvas
76 3/8 x 76 3/8 inches (194 x 194 cm)
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Doom is the House without the Door – 
'Tis entered from the Sun – 
And then the Ladder's thrown away,
Because Escape – is done – 

 

'Tis varied by the Dream
Of what they do outside – 
Where Squirrels play – and Berries die – 
And Hemlocks – bow – to God – 

 

–Emily Dickinson

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present The House Without the Door at the gallery's 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces. The exhibition includes works by Adel Abdessemed, David Altmejd, Francis Alÿs, Mamma Andersson, Louise Bourgeois, Michael Brown, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Maureen Gallace, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Mona Hatoum, Toba Khedoori, Charles LeDray, Thomas Ruff, Gregor Schneider, Luc Tuymans, Jeff Wall, and Rachel Whiteread.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Respected writer and critic Hilton Als curates paintings and drawings Alice Neel (1900-1984) made during the five decades she spent living in Upper Manhattan, first in Spanish Harlem and later the Upper West Side.

 

One of the foremost American figurative painters of the twentieth century, Neel is known for her portraits of family, friends, neighbors, and locals as well as writers, poets, and other cultural and political figures.

 

This exhibition highlights the innate diversity of Neel's approach. As Als notes, Neel "was attracted to a world of difference and painted that. Still, her work was not marred by ideological concerns; what fascinated her was the breadth of humanity that she encountered in her studio, on canvas…Alice Neel, Uptown, the first comprehensive look at Neel's portraits of people of color, is an attempt to honor not only what Neel saw, but the generosity behind her seeing."

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

Curators 
Layout 
Alice Neel
Building in Harlem, c. 1945
Oil on canvas
34 x 24 1/8 inches (86.4 x 61.3 cm)
Alice Neel
Mercedes Arroyo, 1952
Oil on canvas
25 x 24 1/8 inches (63.5 x 61.3 cm)
Alice Neel
Horace Cayton, 1949
Oil on canvas
30 1/4 x 24 inches (76.8 x 61 cm)
Alice Neel
Anselmo, 1962
Oil on canvas
30 x 22 inches (76.2 x 55.9 cm)
Alice Neel
Two Puerto Rican Boys, 1956
Oil on canvas
32 x 28 inches (81.3 x 71.1 cm)
Alice Neel
Pregnant Maria, 1964
Oil on canvas
32 x 47 inches (81.3 x 119.4 cm)
Alice Neel
Armando Perez, 1945
Oil on canvas
30 x 24 1/2 inches (76.2 x 62.2 cm)
Alice Neel
Cyrus, the Gentle Iranian, 1979
Oil on canvas
39 7/8 x 30 1/8 inches (101.3 x 76.5 cm)
Alice Neel
Black Man, 1966
Oil on canvas
44 x 28 1/8 inches (111.8 x 71.4 cm)
Alice Neel
Stephen Shepard, 1978
Oil on canvas
32 x 24 inches (81.3 x 61 cm)
Alice Neel
Ed Sun, 1971
Oil on canvas
42 x 30 inches (106.7 x 76.2 cm)
Alice Neel
Yumiko Okamura, 1976
Ink on paper
40 x 25 inches (101.6 x 63.5 cm)
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David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new sculptures by Carol Bove, marking her first show with the gallery in New York. Spanning two adjacent spaces on 525 and 533 West 19th Street in Chelsea, Polka Dots follows the artist's 2015 exhibition at David Zwirner's London location.

 

Bove is known for her assemblages that combine found and made elements. Incorporating a wide range of domestic, industrial, and natural objects, her sculptures, paintings, and prints reveal the poetry of their materials. As the art historian Johanna Burton notes in the catalogue accompanying this exhibition, "Bove brings things together not to nudge associative impulses into free play driven by the unconscious, but rather to conjure a kind of affective tangle that disrupts any singular, historical narrative."

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Carol Bove
Hylomorph I, 2016
Steel, found steel, and urethane paint
71 1/2 x 42 x 51 inches (181.6 x 106.7 x 129.5 cm)
Carol Bove
The Bicycle, 2016
Stainless steel, found steel, and urethane paint
52 x 89 x 51 inches (132.1 x 226.1 x 129.5 cm)
Carol Bove
Luxembourg, 2016
Stainless steel, found steel, and urethane paint
72 x 48 x 47 inches (182.9 x 121.9 x 119.4 cm)
Carol Bove
Polka Dots
Found steel, stainless steel, and urethane paint
91 x 81 x 87 inches (231.1 x 205.7 x 221 cm)
Carol Bove
First Blue Column, 2016
Stainless steel and urethane paint
105 x 18 x 16 inches (266.7 x 45.7 x 40.6 cm)
Carol Bove
Snail, 2016
Stainless steel and urethane paint
71 1/4 x 122 x 48 inches (181 x 309.9 x 121.9 cm)
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David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of photographs from Philip-Lorca diCorcia's Hustlers series (1990–1992), on view at the gallery's 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces in New York. Also displayed, and shown for the first time in the United States, will be a room-sized installation composed of three synchronized single-channel projections entitled Best Seen, Not Heard (2012). An exhibition of the artist's East of Eden series will be concurrently presented at the gallery's London location (24 Grafton Street) from September 25 to November 16, 2013.

 

Taken just over twenty years ago in Los Angeles in the vicinity of Santa Monica Boulevard, Hustlers is considered to be one of diCorcia's best-known series. It features male prostitutes posing for the camera for a fee loosely equivalent to what they would charge for their sexual services. DiCorcia paid the subjects with grant money awarded to him by the National Endowment for the Arts, a bold gesture during the controversial years that witnessed censorship of NEA-supported exhibitions by Robert Mapplethorpe, Andres Serrano, and other artists. In 1993, twenty-one works from Hustlers were on view at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, marking diCorcia's first museum solo exhibition. Two decades later, the exhibition at David Zwirner presents thirty-six photographs from the series, including twelve works newly produced and shown for the first time.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Ike Cole, 38 years old, Los Angeles, California, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 36 inches (60.3 x 91.4 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Tim Morgan Jr., 21 years old, Los Angeles, California, $25 / Joe Egure, 18 years old, Los Angeles, California, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 36 inches (60.3 x 91.4 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Todd M. Brooks, 22 years old, Denver, Colorado, $40, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
25 x 38 inches (63.5 x 96.5 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Champagne, 19 years old, California, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 35 5/8 inches (60.3 x 90.5 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Ralph Smith, 21 years old Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 36 3/8 inches (60.3 x 92.4 cm)
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Opening on November 22, 2006, Zwirner & Wirth and David Zwirner will present concurrent exhibitions of sculptures and drawings by the American artist Fred Sandback (1943-2003). Surveying the artist's uniquely focused career, this will be the first large-scale exhibition of Sandback's work organized in the United States since it was presented at Dia Center for the Arts, New York in 1996-1997. Known for sculptures that outline imaginary planes and volumes in space with colored yarn, Sandback's work is informed by a rigorously minimal artistic vocabulary. This two-part exhibition will trace the development of his practice, with works dating from 1967 to 2003.

 

Though Sandback employed metal and elastic cord in his earliest works, the artist would soon dispense almost entirely with the mass and weight of materials by using acrylic yarn to create sculptures that produce perceptual illusions while also addressing their physical surroundings and the "pedestrian space," as Sandback called it, of everyday life. Throughout the course of his career, yarn would enable the artist to elaborate on the phenomenological experience of space and volumes with unwavering consistency and ingenuity. As Thomas McEvilley notes, "like a patient and conscientious researcher Sandback made his way through the world of art and space by careful and precise steps–yet found a route that was peculiarly his own and has a certain claim to uniqueness in his overall idea of a sculpture with no inside, no relationship between surface and interior."¹ The exhibition will examine the broad scope of formal invention that the artist was able to achieve with this restricted idiom of yarn lines in space. Sandback's sculptural compositions are comprised of lengths of yarn stretched horizontally, vertically, or diagonally in a variety of configurations that include rectangles, triangles, U-shapes, and floor-to-ceiling vertical lines. The works on view range from smaller-sized wood wall reliefs to constructions that encompass entire rooms, thus demonstrating how the artist was able to create this signature vocabulary of forms in different combinations and scales.

 

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Layout 
Fred Sandback
Black Piet After P.M.: Composition with Red, Yellow, Blue, 1930, 2003
Black paint on plywood
20 x 20 x 1 1/8 inches (50.8 x 50.8 x 2.9 cm)
Fred Sandback
Untitled, 1985
White acrylic yarn
Dimensions will vary with installation
Fred Sandback
Untitled (Sculptural Study, White Wall Relief, 2003/2006
White paint on wood
Overall: 36 1/4 x 68 1/4 inches (92.1 x 173.4 cm) Panel 1: 36 x 21 5/8 inches (91.4 x 54.9 cm) Panel 2: 36 x 8 5/8 inches (91.4 x 21.9 cm) Panel 3: 36 x 24 inches (91.4 x 61 cm)
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Opening on June 28, 2007, David Zwirner is pleased to present a point in space is a place for an argument. Deriving its title from Ludwig Wittgenstein's seminal text, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, the exhibition will include a selection of works by thirty artists: Hans Accola, Lynda Benglis, Forrest Bess, Julien Bismuth, Andre Cadere, John Chamberlain, Raoul De Keyser, Vincent Fecteau, Isa Genzken, Mary Heilmann, Eva Hesse, Alfred Jensen, Mike Kelley, Rachel Khedoori, Lee Lozano, Michael Mahalchik, Gordon Matta-Clark, Paul McCarthy, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Joe Overstreet, Steven Parrino, Jason Rhoades, Dieter Roth, Niki de Saint Phalle, Fred Sandback, Katy Schimert, Al Taylor, Paul Thek, and Cathy Wilkes.

 

Wittgenstein argued an object's existence is predicated on its situation in space; a point in a visual field must have color and a tactile object must have a degree of solidity to differentiate it from infinite space. Spanning the last five decades, the works on view present multiple modes by which artists have approached the object in space. The abstract philosophy becomes physical as artists engage the tensions of materiality, form, and function.

 

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Opening on September 20, 2007, David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by artist Chris Ofili, who lives and works in Trinidad. This will be Ofili's debut solo exhibition at David Zwirner and the first to unite his work in painting, sculpture, printmaking, and graphite drawing. A fully illustrated catalogue will be published by Steidl/David Zwirner in conjunction with the exhibition.

 

Ofili began to garner attention in the mid-1990s with his intricately constructed works, combining bead-like dots of paint, informed in part by cave paintings in Zimbabwe, with collaged images from popular media, and elephant dung. Despite shifts in his material choices, the artist has remained committed to a painting process that relies on deliberate flattening of the picture plane, carefully layered surfaces, and diffuse sources of inspiration. Over the years, both formally and conceptually, Ofili has paid homage and forged dialogue with works by artists ranging from William Hogarth, Philip Guston, Henri Matisse, William Blake, to the Blue Rider group. In this exhibition, Ofili continues, in a variety of media, his active engagement with art history and traditions of representation.

 

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Layout 
Chris Ofili
Lover's rock - Guilt, 2007
Oil and charcoal on linen
110 1/4 x 76 3/4 inches (280 x 194.9 cm)
Chris Ofili
Confession (red), 2006-2007
Oil and charcoal on canvas
31 1/2 x 19 7/8 inches (80 x 50.5 cm)
Chris Ofili
Annunciation, 2006
Bronze
87 x 39 x 45 inches (221 x 99.1 x 114.3 cm)
Location 

Opening on November 9, 2007, David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by German artist Thomas Ruff. This will be the artist’s fifth solo exhibition at the gallery. In 2007, Ruff was the subject of two one-person museum exhibitions at Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden and the Sprengel Museum, Hannover, Germany. His numerous group exhibitions recently include Depth of Field: Modern Photography, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY; What does the jellyfish want? Photographs from Man Ray to James Coleman, Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; Fast Forward: Collections for the Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX (all 2007); Desacogedor: Escenas fantasmas en la sociedad global, La Bienal Internacional de Arte Contemporáneo de Sevilla, Seville, Spain; Super Vision, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA; and Ecotopia: The Second ICP Triennial of Photography and Video, International Center of Photography, New York, NY (all 2006). He was the 2006 recipient of the Infinity Award for Art presented by the International Center of Photography, New York, NY.

 

In this exhibition, Ruff continues to explore the distribution and reception of images in the digital age through his jpeg series. Using JPEGs (the standard compression files for Internet images) culled primarily from the World Wide Web, Ruff attempts to create a visual lexicon or encyclopedic compendium of contemporary history, cataloguing locations, events, and natural phenomenon. Enlarged by the artist to gigantic scale, the JPEGs become geometric displays of color; the exaggerated pixel patterns leave the image nearly unrecognizable from close view. Much like Impressionist paintings, these photographs require the viewer to stand at a distance in order to make a visual assessment of the image content. The distinct modes of viewing–close, mid-range, and far–integral to fully processing the works, challenge viewers to examine the way they look at images in the art context and the everyday. Further, instead of straightforwardly titling the works to communicate their historical and geographic reference points, Ruff employs acronyms, calling upon viewers to decode and determine meaning.

 

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