The concurrent exhibition Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Nets is on view at 34 East 69th Street on the Upper East Side through December 22, 2017.

 

Plan your visit to Festival of Life

 

The gallery will be closed on Thursday, November 23 in observance of Thanksgiving. Normal hours will resume on Friday and Saturday.

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present two major concurrent exhibitions of recent work by Yayoi Kusama on view across three gallery spaces in New York: Festival of Life at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in Chelsea and Infinity Nets at the recently opened space on 34 East 69th Street on the Upper East Side. The exhibitions will feature sixty-six paintings from her iconic My Eternal Soul series, new large-scale flower sculptures, a polka-dotted environment, and two Infinity Mirror Rooms in the Chelsea locations, and a selection of new Infinity Nets paintings uptown. 

 

Kusama’s work has transcended some of the most important art movements of the second half of the twentieth century, including Pop art and Minimalism. Born in 1929 in Matsumoto, Japan, she briefly studied painting in Kyoto before moving to New York City in the late 1950s. She began her large-scale infinity net paintings during this decade, and went on to apply their obsessive, hallucinatory qualities to three-dimensional work. In a unique style that is both sensory and utopian, Kusama’s work—which spans paintings, performances, room-size presentations, sculptural installations, literary works, films, fashion, design, and interventions within existing architectural structures—possesses a highly personal character, yet one that has connected profoundly with large audiences around the globe. Throughout her career she has been able to break down traditional barriers between work, artist, and spectator.

 

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Yayoi Kusama
MY SOUL IS WANDERING, 2013
Acrylic on canvas
76 3/8 x 76 3/8 inches (194 x 194 cm)
Yayoi Kusama
CLOUDS ARE CONSIDERING, 2013
Acrylic on canvas
76 3/8 x 76 3/8 inches (194 x 194 cm)
Location 
Opening reception 
November 2, 6 – 8 PM

Doom is the House without the Door – 
'Tis entered from the Sun – 
And then the Ladder's thrown away,
Because Escape – is done – 

 

'Tis varied by the Dream
Of what they do outside – 
Where Squirrels play – and Berries die – 
And Hemlocks – bow – to God – 

 

–Emily Dickinson

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present The House Without the Door at the gallery's 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces. The exhibition includes works by Adel Abdessemed, David Altmejd, Francis Alÿs, Mamma Andersson, Louise Bourgeois, Michael Brown, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Maureen Gallace, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Mona Hatoum, Toba Khedoori, Charles LeDray, Thomas Ruff, Gregor Schneider, Luc Tuymans, Jeff Wall, and Rachel Whiteread.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Location 

Respected writer and critic Hilton Als curates paintings and drawings Alice Neel (1900-1984) made during the five decades she spent living in Upper Manhattan, first in Spanish Harlem and later the Upper West Side.

 

One of the foremost American figurative painters of the twentieth century, Neel is known for her portraits of family, friends, neighbors, and locals as well as writers, poets, and other cultural and political figures.

 

This exhibition highlights the innate diversity of Neel's approach. As Als notes, Neel "was attracted to a world of difference and painted that. Still, her work was not marred by ideological concerns; what fascinated her was the breadth of humanity that she encountered in her studio, on canvas…Alice Neel, Uptown, the first comprehensive look at Neel's portraits of people of color, is an attempt to honor not only what Neel saw, but the generosity behind her seeing."

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

Curators 
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Alice Neel
Building in Harlem, c. 1945
Oil on canvas
34 x 24 1/8 inches (86.4 x 61.3 cm)
Alice Neel
Mercedes Arroyo, 1952
Oil on canvas
25 x 24 1/8 inches (63.5 x 61.3 cm)
Alice Neel
Horace Cayton, 1949
Oil on canvas
30 1/4 x 24 inches (76.8 x 61 cm)
Alice Neel
Anselmo, 1962
Oil on canvas
30 x 22 inches (76.2 x 55.9 cm)
Alice Neel
Two Puerto Rican Boys, 1956
Oil on canvas
32 x 28 inches (81.3 x 71.1 cm)
Alice Neel
Pregnant Maria, 1964
Oil on canvas
32 x 47 inches (81.3 x 119.4 cm)
Alice Neel
Armando Perez, 1945
Oil on canvas
30 x 24 1/2 inches (76.2 x 62.2 cm)
Alice Neel
Cyrus, the Gentle Iranian, 1979
Oil on canvas
39 7/8 x 30 1/8 inches (101.3 x 76.5 cm)
Alice Neel
Black Man, 1966
Oil on canvas
44 x 28 1/8 inches (111.8 x 71.4 cm)
Alice Neel
Stephen Shepard, 1978
Oil on canvas
32 x 24 inches (81.3 x 61 cm)
Alice Neel
Ed Sun, 1971
Oil on canvas
42 x 30 inches (106.7 x 76.2 cm)
Alice Neel
Yumiko Okamura, 1976
Ink on paper
40 x 25 inches (101.6 x 63.5 cm)
Location 

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new sculptures by Carol Bove, marking her first show with the gallery in New York. Spanning two adjacent spaces on 525 and 533 West 19th Street in Chelsea, Polka Dots follows the artist's 2015 exhibition at David Zwirner's London location.

 

Bove is known for her assemblages that combine found and made elements. Incorporating a wide range of domestic, industrial, and natural objects, her sculptures, paintings, and prints reveal the poetry of their materials. As the art historian Johanna Burton notes in the catalogue accompanying this exhibition, "Bove brings things together not to nudge associative impulses into free play driven by the unconscious, but rather to conjure a kind of affective tangle that disrupts any singular, historical narrative."

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Carol Bove
Hylomorph I, 2016
Steel, found steel, and urethane paint
71 1/2 x 42 x 51 inches (181.6 x 106.7 x 129.5 cm)
Carol Bove
The Bicycle, 2016
Stainless steel, found steel, and urethane paint
52 x 89 x 51 inches (132.1 x 226.1 x 129.5 cm)
Carol Bove
Luxembourg, 2016
Stainless steel, found steel, and urethane paint
72 x 48 x 47 inches (182.9 x 121.9 x 119.4 cm)
Carol Bove
Polka Dots
Found steel, stainless steel, and urethane paint
91 x 81 x 87 inches (231.1 x 205.7 x 221 cm)
Carol Bove
First Blue Column, 2016
Stainless steel and urethane paint
105 x 18 x 16 inches (266.7 x 45.7 x 40.6 cm)
Carol Bove
Snail, 2016
Stainless steel and urethane paint
71 1/4 x 122 x 48 inches (181 x 309.9 x 121.9 cm)
Location 

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of photographs from Philip-Lorca diCorcia's Hustlers series (1990–1992), on view at the gallery's 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces in New York. Also displayed, and shown for the first time in the United States, will be a room-sized installation composed of three synchronized single-channel projections entitled Best Seen, Not Heard (2012). An exhibition of the artist's East of Eden series will be concurrently presented at the gallery's London location (24 Grafton Street) from September 25 to November 16, 2013.

 

Taken just over twenty years ago in Los Angeles in the vicinity of Santa Monica Boulevard, Hustlers is considered to be one of diCorcia's best-known series. It features male prostitutes posing for the camera for a fee loosely equivalent to what they would charge for their sexual services. DiCorcia paid the subjects with grant money awarded to him by the National Endowment for the Arts, a bold gesture during the controversial years that witnessed censorship of NEA-supported exhibitions by Robert Mapplethorpe, Andres Serrano, and other artists. In 1993, twenty-one works from Hustlers were on view at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, marking diCorcia's first museum solo exhibition. Two decades later, the exhibition at David Zwirner presents thirty-six photographs from the series, including twelve works newly produced and shown for the first time.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Ike Cole, 38 years old, Los Angeles, California, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 36 inches (60.3 x 91.4 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Tim Morgan Jr., 21 years old, Los Angeles, California, $25 / Joe Egure, 18 years old, Los Angeles, California, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 36 inches (60.3 x 91.4 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Todd M. Brooks, 22 years old, Denver, Colorado, $40, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
25 x 38 inches (63.5 x 96.5 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Champagne, 19 years old, California, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 35 5/8 inches (60.3 x 90.5 cm)
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Ralph Smith, 21 years old Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, $25, 1990-92
Chromogenic print
23 3/4 x 36 3/8 inches (60.3 x 92.4 cm)
Location 

Opening on November 22, 2006, Zwirner & Wirth and David Zwirner will present concurrent exhibitions of sculptures and drawings by the American artist Fred Sandback (1943-2003). Surveying the artist's uniquely focused career, this will be the first large-scale exhibition of Sandback's work organized in the United States since it was presented at Dia Center for the Arts, New York in 1996-1997. Known for sculptures that outline imaginary planes and volumes in space with colored yarn, Sandback's work is informed by a rigorously minimal artistic vocabulary. This two-part exhibition will trace the development of his practice, with works dating from 1967 to 2003.

 

Though Sandback employed metal and elastic cord in his earliest works, the artist would soon dispense almost entirely with the mass and weight of materials by using acrylic yarn to create sculptures that produce perceptual illusions while also addressing their physical surroundings and the "pedestrian space," as Sandback called it, of everyday life. Throughout the course of his career, yarn would enable the artist to elaborate on the phenomenological experience of space and volumes with unwavering consistency and ingenuity. As Thomas McEvilley notes, "like a patient and conscientious researcher Sandback made his way through the world of art and space by careful and precise steps–yet found a route that was peculiarly his own and has a certain claim to uniqueness in his overall idea of a sculpture with no inside, no relationship between surface and interior."¹ The exhibition will examine the broad scope of formal invention that the artist was able to achieve with this restricted idiom of yarn lines in space. Sandback's sculptural compositions are comprised of lengths of yarn stretched horizontally, vertically, or diagonally in a variety of configurations that include rectangles, triangles, U-shapes, and floor-to-ceiling vertical lines. The works on view range from smaller-sized wood wall reliefs to constructions that encompass entire rooms, thus demonstrating how the artist was able to create this signature vocabulary of forms in different combinations and scales.

 

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Fred Sandback
Black Piet After P.M.: Composition with Red, Yellow, Blue, 1930, 2003
Black paint on plywood
20 x 20 x 1 1/8 inches (50.8 x 50.8 x 2.9 cm)
Fred Sandback
Untitled, 1985
White acrylic yarn
Dimensions will vary with installation
Fred Sandback
Untitled (Sculptural Study, White Wall Relief, 2003/2006
White paint on wood
Overall: 36 1/4 x 68 1/4 inches (92.1 x 173.4 cm) Panel 1: 36 x 21 5/8 inches (91.4 x 54.9 cm) Panel 2: 36 x 8 5/8 inches (91.4 x 21.9 cm) Panel 3: 36 x 24 inches (91.4 x 61 cm)

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by German painter Neo Rauch. In 2007, Rauch was the subject of a solo exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, which then traveled to the Max Ernst Museum in Brühl, Germany. He has had one-person exhibitions at such prestigious museums as Rudolfinum Prag, Prague, Czech Republic (2007); Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg, Germany (2006); Musée d'art Contemporain de Montréal, Montreal, Canada (2006); Centro de Arte Contemporá- neo Málaga, Málaga, Spain (2005); and the Albertina, Vienna, Austria (2004). This will be the artist's fourth solo exhibition at the gallery.

 

Educated at the now legendary Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig, Germany, Rauch (b. 1960) has become one of his generation's most influential and virtuoso painters. He continues the rich tradition of Leipzig figurative painting. The artist transforms typical industrious scenes into veritable dreamscapes, transporting viewers to a deeply personal and enigmatic, symbolic universe.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Neo Rauch
Das Plateau, 2008
Oil on canvas
82 2/3 x 118 1/8 inches (210 x 300 cm)
Neo Rauch
Die Stickerin, 2008
Oil on canvas
118 1/8 x 165 2/5 inches (300 x 420 cm)
Neo Rauch
Die Aufnahme, 2008
Oil on canvas
118 1/8 x 98 3/8 inches (300 x 250 cm)
Neo Rauch
Maifeier, 2008
Oil on paper
83.46 x 57.48 inches (212 x 146 cm)
Location 

David Zwirner and Zwirner & Wirth will present the work of American artist Fred Sandback (1943-2003) in two concurrent exhibitions.

 

Sandback's sculptures outline planes and volumes in space. Though he employed metal wire and elastic cord early in his career, the artist soon dispensed with mass and weight by using acrylic yarn to create works that address their physical surroundings, the "pedestrian space," as Sandback called it, of everyday life. By stretching lengths of yarn horizontally, vertically, or diagonally at different scales and in varied configurations, the artist developed a singular body of work that elaborated on the phenomenological experience of space and volume with unwavering consistency and ingenuity.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

Layout 

Primary Atmospheres: Works from California 1960-1970 will present to the New York public a long-overdue survey of the particular kind of minimal work that was made in and around Los Angeles, work which differentiated itself in its emphasis on surface, synthetic materials, industrial processes, and perception. Often referred to under the umbrella term “Light and Space,” the artists and artwork included in this exhibition will present a more inclusive overview of the ground-breaking and diverse art practices that flourished in California in the 1960s. The exhibition includes rarely seen works by Peter Alexander, Larry Bell, Laddie John Dill, Robert Irwin, Craig Kauffman, John McCracken, Helen Pashgian, James Turrell, De Wain Valentine, and Doug Wheeler.

 

While most of the artworks included in the exhibition can be referred to as minimal in form, their seductive surfaces, often made out of nontraditional materials, and their luminescent use of color and light characterize them as uniquely Southern Californian. Distinguishing themselves from their East Coast Minimalist counterparts, the California artists in the exhibition were reacting to local concerns with light and atmosphere, often evoking the qualities of the bright Los Angeles sunlight and the shiny, finished surfaces of the city's ubiquitous signs and automobiles. Noted for translucent, reflective, or ethereal surfaces, the work made by these artists explored the often ephemeral boundaries between painting and sculpture and the broader experiential possibilities of art.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Location 

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Donald Judd drawn from the artist's seminal 1989 exhibition held at the Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden, Germany. Brought together from international public and private collections, this will be the first time these particular works have been exhibited together in a group of this size since Judd's 1989 installation.

 

The exhibition, which will span both of the gallery’s spaces at 525 and 533 West 19th Street, will reflect the artist's intended clarity and rigor in its installation. These works comprise one of Judd's few explorations of color on a large scale using anodized aluminum and thus provide a focused investigation of the key concerns within Judd's practice.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Donald Judd
Untitled, 1989
Anodized aluminum clear and amber and black acrylic sheets
39 3/8 x 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 inches (100 x 200 x 200 cm)
Donald Judd
Untitled, 1989
Anodized aluminum clear and blue with blue acrylic sheet
39 3/8 x 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 inches (100 x 200 x 200 cm)
Donald Judd
Untitled, 1988
Pencil and ballpoint pen on paper
8 1/4 x 11 5/8 inches (21 x 29.5 cm)
Location 

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