GOBRO0014A

Availability 
None
Artists 
Dimensions 
28 x 29 x 24 inches (71.1 x 73.7 x 61 cm)
Materials 
Plaster, wire, lath, wood, and semi-gloss enamel paint
Images format 
Artwork
Photo Credit 

Private Collection

Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Untitled

Year 
1984-1988

Doom is the House without the Door – 
'Tis entered from the Sun – 
And then the Ladder's thrown away,
Because Escape – is done – 

 

'Tis varied by the Dream
Of what they do outside – 
Where Squirrels play – and Berries die – 
And Hemlocks – bow – to God – 

 

–Emily Dickinson

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present The House Without the Door at the gallery's 525 and 533 West 19th Street spaces. The exhibition includes works by Adel Abdessemed, David Altmejd, Francis Alÿs, Mamma Andersson, Louise Bourgeois, Michael Brown, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Maureen Gallace, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Mona Hatoum, Toba Khedoori, Charles LeDray, Thomas Ruff, Gregor Schneider, Luc Tuymans, Jeff Wall, and Rachel Whiteread.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Zwirner & Wirth is pleased to present an exhibition of Outdoor Sculpture at David Zwirner's 519 West 19th Street gallery space. The works on view will include a selection of works spanning the years 1969 to 2006 by Carl Andre, Mark di Suvero, Robert Gober, Sol LeWitt, John McCracken, and Franz West.

 

The works on view will explore the development of sculptural concerns that were uniquely addressed by these artists, showing how traditional, monumental sculpture was transformed to include work that expanded the relationship of sculpture to the space of the viewer. By the 1960s, the notion of sculpture as a static, pedestal-based medium that idealized and monumentalized its subject matter was radically extended to include works that addressed their physical and temporal surroundings. These concerns would continue to be developed by a range of artists over the course of the pursuant decades and, moreover, would be examined within the broader context of the outdoors.

 

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Not so long ago, the history of modern art appeared to move forward in a fairly orderly progression from one movement to another. There was something almost biblical about this progress–Impressionism begat Post Impressionism, Post Impressionism begat Cubism, Cubism begat Surrealism, Surrealism begat Abstract Expressionism, and so on. In this view, art moved forward by extending or reacting against the preceding set of reigning assumptions, yielding a pleasing linear development from one set of influences to the next.

 

Things began to get more complicated in the1960s and 70s, as art moved through a dizzying series of changes predicated, it seemed at times, on little more than an attitude of negation toward all that had gone before. Still, the dream of order held on through the 1980s, as Neo Expressionism begat Neo Geo and Neo Geo begat Simulationism.

 

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In an election year, one might examine how politics can be addressed in art. Finding inspiration in the axiom that Francis Alÿs explored in his recent exhibition at David Zwirner, which posited that "sometimes doing something poetic can become political, and sometimes doing something political can become poetic," this exhibition will specifically investigate the ostensibly 'understated' politics that inform a number of artists who have found powerful ways of commenting on social and political concerns as part of a multi-layered artistic practice. 

The works in Quiet Politics are characterized by their ability to address politics in a way that reveals itself poetically–by calling attention to myriad issues (the history of art, identity politics, globalization, consumerism, violence, and social inequality, among others) through seemingly simple aesthetic or conceptual gestures. Such works carry the potential to expand the means of political expression and consciousness. 

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Much too simple, doubtless. But such is the nature of the real…. Ought we not first learn to fly backward too, or stand still in the air like a hummingbird?
— Henry Miller

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present Stand still like the hummingbird, an exhibition curated by Bellatrix Hubert in the gallery's 525 and 533 spaces. It takes its title from a collection of short stories and essays by American writer Henry Miller, published in 1962. Known equally for his mysticism and dark humor, Miller proposed the idea of "flying backwards, standing still like a hummingbird" as a lighthearted antidote to the frantic pace of modern society.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

Curators 
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Location 

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of work that examines the 1980s through the lens of the Cologne and New York art scenes of the period. Spanning the gallery's exhibition spaces at 525 and 533 West 19th Street and 537 West 20th Street, the exhibition will include Werner Büttner, George Condo, Walter Dahn, Jiri Georg Dokoupil, Peter Fischli/David Weiss, Günther Förg, Robert Gober, Georg Herold, Jenny Holzer, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger, Sherrie Levine, Albert Oehlen, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Rosemarie Trockel, Franz West, and Christopher Wool.

 

The contemporary art that was created and presented in New York and Cologne during the 1980s shaped a certain creative discourse between artists, curators, and gallerists on both sides of the Atlantic. This exhibition proposes an examination of this dialogue by focusing on the international artists who showed in both New York and Cologne between 1984 and 1989 and the key gallery and museum exhibitions of the period that took place in both cities.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

Layout 
Jeff Koons
Ushering in Banality, 1988
Polychromed wood
38 x 66 x 31 inches (96.5 x 167.6 x 78.7 cm)
Franz West
Selbiges (The Thing Itself), 1987
Iron, wood, papier-mâché, polyester, and oil paint
65 1/4 x 95 x 11 3/4 inches (165.7 x 241.3 x 29.8 cm)
Raymond Pettibon
No Title (CCCP Sputnik cosmo...), 1990
Acrylic on panel
26 x 24 1/8 inches (66 x 61.3 cm)
Cindy Sherman
Untitled #180, 1987
Set of two (2) chromogenic color prints
Overall: 94 1/4 x 128 1/2 inches (239.4 x 326.4 cm) Each: 94 1/4 x 64 1/4 inches (239.4 x 163.2 cm)
Peter Fischli/David Weiss
Masturbine, 1984
Gelatin silver print
11 7/8 x 15 3/4 inches (30 x 40 cm)
Barbara Kruger
Untitled (I Shop Therefore I Am), 1987
Photographic silkscreen on vinyl
111 5/8 x 113 1/4 inches (283.5 x 287.7 cm)
Sherrie Levine
Untitled (Checks: 6), 1986
Casein and wax on mahogany
24 1/8 x 20 inches (61.3 x 50.8 cm)
Robert Gober
Untitled, 1984-1988
Plaster, wire, lath, wood, and semi-gloss enamel paint
28 x 29 x 24 inches (71.1 x 73.7 x 61 cm)

"Everything leads us to believe that there exists a state of mind where life and death, the real and the imaginary, the past and future, the communicable and the incommunicable, high and low, no longer seem contradictory"

–Andre Breton, The Surrealist Manifesto, 1924

 

The Proper Meaning is a group exhibition that brings together artists from different periods of the 20th century all sharing an interest in the surreal. The exhibition will include paintings, sculptures and drawings.

 

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