RICGE0216.46

Availability 
Inquire
Artists 
Dimensions 
7 3/4 x 7 3/4 x 5/8 inches (19.5 x 19.5 x 1.5 cm)
Materials 
Steel
Additional 
Edition 46 of 80
Images format 
Thumbnail
Photo Credit 

Stamped '46/80, Gerhard Richter 1997' verso Published by Anthony d'Offay Gallery, London Manufactured by FAG Kugelfischer, Schweinfurt

Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Kreuz (Cross)

Year 
1997

RICGE0117

Availability 
None
Artists 
Dimensions 
31.5 x 39.4 in (80 x 100 cm)
Materials 
Oil on canvas
Images format 
Artwork
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Gilbert & George

Year 
1975

RICGE0106

Availability 
None
Artists 
Dimensions 
22 1/4 x 16 1/2 in (56.5 x 41.9 cm)
Materials 
Graphite on paper
Images format 
Artwork
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Study for Kleiner Akt (Small Nude)

Year 
1967

David Zwirner is pleased to present Markers, a group exhibition at the London gallery on 24 Grafton Street featuring work by Matt Connors, Michael Dean, Marlene Dumas, Goutam Ghosh, Josh Kline, Gillian Lowndes, John Outterbridge, Gerhard Richter, Celso Renato, Jason Rhoades, Prem Sahib, and Pádraig Timoney. 

 

Like the exclamation mark, and the multivalent and shifting sentiments it has come to represent, this exhibition will encompass artworks that evoke diffuse and even contradictory meanings within a single visual gesture. The exclamation mark is believed to have originated in the Medieval era, when copyists would append the Latin word io (literally “hooray”) to the end of a sentence in order to indicate joy, and eventually the letters were consolidated into a single character. Over the centuries, its connotations have become corrupted: it is simultaneously warning and exaltation, interjection and admonition, ecstatic and sober. Likewise, this exhibition will include works by both emerging and established artists that elicit such oppositional emotions at once, frequently as a means of negotiating the polarities and vagaries of contemporary society. Mirroring this semiotic shift in particular is the transition from analogue to digital culture, and the shorthand and indeterminate mode of expression it has engendered. 

 

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Zwirner & Wirth is pleased to present an exhibition of American and German Pop Art. Scheduled to open on May 4 and close on July 1, 2005, this exhibition will examine some of the formal and conceptual concerns shared by the artists Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke, and Gerhard Richter.

 

 

Known mostly as an American phenomenon of the 1960s, Pop Art is characterized by a blurring of the boundaries between art and life in its exploration of such themes as consumerism, cultural icons, and mass-reproduced imagery. Gerhard Richter and Konrad Lueg (later known as the gallerist Konrad Fischer) traveled to Paris in 1963, where they declared themselves to be "German Pop artists" after visiting the galleries of Iris Clert and Ileana Sonnabend, who showed the leading American pop artists of the day. In the press release for the legendary 1963 Düsseldorf exhibition of the work of Lueg, Polke, Richter and Manfred Kuttner, organized by the artists and displayed in an empty butcher's shop, the artists wrote: 

 

The value of the exhibition derives from the themes of the works on show. For the first time in Germany, these will include works that may be described as Pop Art, Imperialist or Capitalist Realism, New Sobriety, Naturalism, German Pop and the like. Pop Art recognizes the modern mass media as a genuine cultural phenomenon and draws, with artifice, on the attributes, formulations and contents of the modern mass media for its own artistic expression. Thus it is changing the face of modern painting, heralding an aesthetic revolution.

 

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The exhibition Gerhard Richter “Landscapes” consists of nine paintings tracing almost 40 years of landscape painting by the artist. The landscape is the most frequently reoccurring motif in Richter’s oeuvre, and no other subject has preoccupied the artist over such a long period of time. It is also the one subject that melds, most coherently, the two “styles” of painting that has engaged Richter since the 1960s: abstraction and figuration.

 

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In 1961, Sigmar Polke and Gerhard Richter enrolled in the Art Academy in Düsseldorf, to be followed in 1962 by Blinky Palermo. Each student had found their way to the renowned art school from various areas of East Germany and within the first years at the academy, productive and competitive friendships would be formed and collaborations, taking on various shapes, would emerge. This exhibition will present a selection of paintings, which demonstrate the formal and thematic interests of this highly influential artistic group as they grappled with the dominance of the American Pop movement and their own German cultural inheritance.

 

In the early years of the 1960s, Polke's and Richter's growing dissatisfaction with the predominating style of the academy of Art Informel, motivated them to seek other sources. A 1963 visit to Paris, where they discovered the work of Roy Lichtenstein, set the stage for their own very individual explorations of popular culture and problems of style. It was Lichtenstein's anti-painterly technique, one devoid of the artist's hand, which would influence the work Polke and Richter both on a practical and conceptual level.

 

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Layout 
Gerhard Richter
Gilbert & George, 1975
Oil on canvas
31.5 x 39.4 in (80 x 100 cm)
Gerhard Richter
Study for Kleiner Akt (Small Nude), 1967
Graphite on paper
22 1/4 x 16 1/2 in (56.5 x 41.9 cm)
Sigmar Polke
Untitled (Strandleben) (Beach Life), 1968
Dispersion on canvas
35 x 29.5 in (89 x 75 cm)
Sigmar Polke
Plastik-Wannen (Plastic Tubs), 1964
Oil on canvas
37.4 x 47.2 in (95 x 120 cm)
Location 

David Zwirner and Iwan Wirth are pleased to announce the opening of their new gallery, Zwirner & Wirth, at 32 East 69th Street on February 23rd, 2000. Their inaugural exhibition entitled, Gerhard Richter: Early Paintings will include works from the 1960s and 1970s by the German artist.

 

This new partnership unites New York gallerist David Zwirner and Swiss dealer Iwan Wirth. The gallery will occupy the first two floors of a townhouse at 69th Street and Madison Avenue, recently renovated by Annabelle Selldorf of Selldorf Architects. The new location will operate in addition to their existing galleries: David Zwirner at 43 Greene Street in New York, and Galerie Hauser & Wirth at Limmatstrasse 270 in Zurich.

 

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Location 
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