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Jason Rhoades
Current exhibition at David Zwirner
November 2017
24 Grafton Street, London
Josh Kline
Sighs of the Times, 2017

November 24—December 20, 2017

David Zwirner is pleased to present Markers, a group exhibition at the London gallery on 24 Grafton Street featuring work by Matt Connors, Michael Dean, Marlene Dumas, Goutam Ghosh, Josh Kline, Gillian Lowndes, John Outterbridge, Gerhard Richter, Celso Renato, Jason Rhoades, Prem Sahib, and Pádraig Timoney.

Like the exclamation mark, and the multivalent and shifting sentiments it has come to represent, this exhibition encompasses artworks that evoke diffuse and even contradictory meanings within a single visual gesture.

The exhibition is organized by Rodolphe von Hofmannsthal, Director, David Zwirner, London.

 

Solo Exhibition at The Brant Foundation Art Study Center, Connecticut
November 2017
Jason Rhoades
The Grand Machine / THEAREOLA, 2002

November 12, 2017 – April 1, 2018

The Brant Foundation Art Study Center will present an exhibition by Jason Rhoades (1965-2006) featuring a selection of works from The Brant Collection and other significant works from throughout his career. By bringing together iconic installations and rarely seen sculptures, the exhibition offers an insightful look at Rhoades's powerful and persuasive oeuvre. The artist is known for his highly original, large-scale sculptural installations, of which the significant examples My Brother/Brancuzi (1995), The Grand Machine / THEAREOLA (2002), and Untitled (from the body of work: My Madinah: In pursuit of my ermitage…) (2004) will feature in this exhibition. A selection of videos pertaining to the works on view will also be presented.

Until his untimely death in 2006 at age 41, Rhoades carried out a continuous assault on aesthetic conventions and the rules governing the art world, wryly subverting those conditions by activating them within his practice. He conceived his works as part of an ongoing project in which the installations were continuously altered and supplemented. Underpinned by a unique combination of humor and conceptual rigor, his practice redefined and expanded the space in which artworks are both made and exhibited. With a firm belief in the ultimate freedom of expression for artists, Rhoades circumvented notions of taste and political correctness in a candid pursuit of the creative impulse itself.

Writing about the artist's many influences in The Miami Rail, Lucas Zwirner notes, "On the one hand, there's the chain of associations; on the other, there's the moment—strange and potent—that sparks the chain . . . In My Brother/Brancusi (1995), it was Jason's sudden vision of a resemblance between Brancusi's studio and the compulsive ordering of his brother's room."

Read the exhibition announcement in ARTNEWS

Unlimited at Art Basel
2017
Installation of Rhoades's Sutter's Mill

The gallery presented Sutter's Mill, an installation by Jason Rhoades, in Art Basel Unlimited 2017.

Sutter's Mill (2000) is Rhoades's reconstruction of Gold Rush pioneer John Sutter's still-extant water-powered sawmill in Coloma in California, near the artist's childhood home. Using aluminum pipes from Rhoades's 1999 Perfect World installation at the Deichtorhallen Hamburg, the life-size structure was first presented at David Zwirner in New York in 2000. Per the artist's instructions, the installation in Art Basel Unlimited will be constantly dismantled and rebuilt by trained handlers during the course of the fair. Next to the model of the mill, various items including replacement pipes, protective headgear, and polishing cloths are laid out on wooden stands to indicate that work is always in progress.

As the art historian Eva Meyer-Hermann notes, the mill is "a symbol not only of artistic production (signified by the gold), but also of a creative process that in principle will never reach a conclusion and that will also never be available to the recipient in a neatly packaged form." Sutter's Mill was included in the critically acclaimed exhibition Jason Rhoades, Four Roads, which travelled from the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia to the Kunsthalle Bremen in Germany and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead in England in 2013-2015.

 

 

 

RHOJA0883.ep

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72 7/8 x 25 5/8 x 17 3/4 inches (185 x 65 x 45 cm)
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Neon Glass: Tookabook; 1 transformer, orange cord with three-plug, rope, armature wire, glass metal lantern, bundle of ceramic peppers, ceramic pepper, 2 miniature hats
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Chandelier 44

Year 
2006

RHOJA1125.ep

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Dimensions 
31 7/8 x 15 x 11 inches (81 x 38 x 28 cm)
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Neon phrase, transformer, camel saddle, various materials
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Trim (Idol 75)

Year 
2005

RHOJA0168

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None
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Dimensions 
82 x 54 x 24 inches (208.3 x 137.2 x 61 cm) Donkey: 50 x 58 x 16 inches (127 x 147.3 x 40.6 cm)
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Seville Ultra Durable chrome shelving system with 7 shelves, 8 neon panels (glass, plexi, wire, transformers), 21 ceramic donkeys, 1 can tuna, cast fiberglass donkey
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Artwork
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Shelf (Rattlesnake Canyon) with Unpainted Donkey

Year 
2003

RHOJA0181

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Dimensions 
PeaRoe Ramp: 61 x 51 x 118 inches (154.9 x 129.5 x 299.7 cm) Honda XR50: 36 x 50 x 30 inches (91.4 x 127 x 76.2 cm)
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PeaRoe Wedge with fidy (2003 XR50 Honda motorcycle)
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PeaRoe Ramp (From Wastewedge, Part of Impetuous Process, 2002), with Embedded HiFi and Honda XR50

Year 
2003

RHOJA0161

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Dimensions 
61 x 63 x 47 1/2 inches (154.9 x 160 x 120.7 cm)
Materials 
Cast fiberglass camel toe bone, neon panel (glass, blue plexi, wire, transformer), Ivory Snow boxes, PeaRoeFoam, Elmers Glue, cardboard, 2 Lifetime folding tables (polyethylene, steel)
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Wailing Wall / Los Feliz Costco and Unpainted Camel Toe

Year 
2003

RHOJA0169

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None
Artists 
Dimensions 
Shelf: 41 x 142 x 60 inches (104.1 x 360.7 x 152.4 cm) Donkey: 50 x 58 x 16 inches (127 x 147.3 x 40.6 cm)
Materials 
Seville Ultra Durable chrome shelving system with 9 shelves, 13 neon panels (glass, plexi, wire, transformers), 31 ceramic
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Grey display
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Seville Ultra Durable chrome shelving system with 9 shelves, 13 neon panels (glass, plexi, wire, transformers)

Year 
2003

David Zwirner is pleased to present Markers, a group exhibition at the London gallery on 24 Grafton Street featuring work by Matt Connors, Michael Dean, Marlene Dumas, Goutam Ghosh, Josh Kline, Gillian Lowndes, John Outterbridge, Gerhard Richter, Celso Renato, Jason Rhoades, Prem Sahib, and Pádraig Timoney. 

 

Like the exclamation mark, and the multivalent and shifting sentiments it has come to represent, this exhibition will encompass artworks that evoke diffuse and even contradictory meanings within a single visual gesture. The exclamation mark is believed to have originated in the Medieval era, when copyists would append the Latin word io (literally “hooray”) to the end of a sentence in order to indicate joy, and eventually the letters were consolidated into a single character. Over the centuries, its connotations have become corrupted: it is simultaneously warning and exaltation, interjection and admonition, ecstatic and sober. Likewise, this exhibition will include works by both emerging and established artists that elicit such oppositional emotions at once, frequently as a means of negotiating the polarities and vagaries of contemporary society. Mirroring this semiotic shift in particular is the transition from analogue to digital culture, and the shorthand and indeterminate mode of expression it has engendered. 

 

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