Artist page 
Gordon Matta-Clark
Current International Museum Exhibitions
June 2018
Jeu de Paume, Paris and MOMAT, Tokyo

This summer, two major museum exhibitions showcase the work of Gordon Matta-Clark in Europe and Asia.

Currently on view at Jeu de Paume, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect travels to Paris from The Bronx Museum of the Arts, where its debut presentation in 2017 drew critical acclaim. Featuring more than one hundred works as well as film projections and rarely seen materials from the artist’s archive, this major survey has been organized by Antonio Sergio Bessa at The Bronx Museum with Jessamyn Fiore, co-director of the Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark. In her review of Anarchitect for The New York Times, Roberta Smith praised this "beautifully staged, streamlined version of the artist’s career [that] still conveys a full picture of his radical sensibility." An accompanying catalogue includes texts by the exhibition’s curators that contextualize Matta-Clark’s practice within the framework of architectural and urban history. Anarchitect will travel to the Kumu Art Museum in Tallinn, Estonia, and the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

In Tokyo, the first full-scale retrospective of Matta-Clark’s work in Asia is on view at The National Museum of Modern Art through September 17, 2018. Gordon Matta-Clark: Mutation in Space encompasses some two hundred works including sculptures, videos, photographs, drawings, and materials relating to the artist’s performances, and will have an accompanying publication. As part of this exhibition, one of the largest works from Matta-Clark’s renowned "building cut" series, Splitting: Four Corners (1974), composed of real building fragments, is on view in Japan for the first time.

Matta-Clark is considered one of the most influential postwar artists. His radical methods of subverting architecture and the urban landscape began with a series of "cuts" he produced in the Bronx borough in New York in the early 1970s. Some of his best-known projects involved laboriously cutting holes in the floors or walls of abandoned or soon-to-be-demolished buildings or, as with Splitting (1974), slicing a house in two. As Martin Filler writes in The New York Review of Books Daily, "Matta-Clark’s audacious hybridization and redefinition of three mediums—architecture, sculpture, and painting—opened new modes of contemporary expression."

Related Events:

Tuesday, June 5, 6–7 PM
Jeu de Paume
Join Antonio Sergio Bessa and Jessamyn Fiore for a tour of Anarchitect.

Tuesday, June 5, 7:30–9 PM (ticketed event)
Jeu de Paume auditorium
Artist Lara Almarcegui, curator Corinne Diserens, Jessamyn Fiore, and curator Jean-Hubert Martin will participate in a round table discussion about the work of Gordon Matta-Clark, led by  Antonio Sergio Bessa.

Image: Gordon Matta-Clark, Day’s End, 1975. © The Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark. Courtesy The Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark.

Jessamyn Fiore and Federica Matta on Gordon Matta-Clark
2018
Talk at The Bronx Museum of the Arts

Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect at The Bronx Museum of the Arts explored how the artist’s practice introduced radical ways of subverting urban architecture, beginning with the series of "cuts" he produced in the Bronx in the early 1970s. Some of his best-known projects involved laboriously cutting holes in the floors or walls of abandoned or soon-to-be-demolished buildings or, as with Splitting (1974), meticulously slicing a house in two.

Saturday, March 10, 5–6 PM
The Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York

Jessamyn Fiore, the exhibition’s curator and co-director of the Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark, and Federica Matta, the artist’s sister, gave a talk about Matta-Clark’s work.

Splitting, Cutting, Writing, Drawing, Eating...Gordon Matta-Clark
2017
Solo exhibition at Serralves Museum in Porto

May 5–September 3, 2017

Splitting, Cutting, Writing, Drawing, Eating...Gordon Matta-Clark explored the actions and activities that characterized the artist's groundbreaking practice.

The exhibition included letters, drawings, photographs, notebooks, and films related to key projects by Matta-Clark drawn from the archive of the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montréal, and focused on the social and creative aspects of his approach—as he described it, of "making space without building it."

GMCTF12

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18:40 min, silent
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16mm film transfer
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Conical Intersect

Year 
1975

GMCT2147

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29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches (75.6 x 100.3 cm)
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Silver dye bleach print (Cibachrome)
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Conical Intersect

Year 
1975

GMCT1049

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14 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches (37.5 x 100.3 cm)
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Silver dye bleach print (Cibachrome)
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Office Baroque

Year 
1977

GMCT202

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29 1/4 x 73 1/4 inches (74.3 x 186.1 cm)
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Silver dye bleach print (Cibachrome)
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Circus

Year 
1978

David Zwirner is pleased to present Brilliant City, a group exhibition organized by Leo Xu at the gallery’s Hong Kong location featuring work by Francis Alÿs, Chen Wei, Stan Douglas, Li Qing, Michael Lin, Gordon Matta-Clark, and Ming Wong. Drawing inspiration from Hong Kong, a vertical city characterized by its lofty high-rise buildings and an archetype of the dystopian metropolis, this exhibition explores how artists across generations and locations have engaged with urban space.

 

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Image: Chen Wei, Iron Sheet, 2015 (detail)

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Francis Alÿs
Zócalo, May 22, 1999, 1999
Single screen DVD projection with soundtrack
Dimensions variable, 12 hour duration
Chen Wei
Falling Light, 2015
Archival inkjet print
59 x 73 7/8 inches (150 x 187.5 cm)
Stan Douglas
Expressway, 2017
Digital chromogenic print mounted on Dibond aluminum
30 x 80 inches (76.2 x 203.2 cm)
Li Qing
Neighbor's Window: Upturned Eaves, 2018
Wood, Plexiglas, oil, and aluminium-plastic panel
59 1/2 x 46 5/8 x 4 3/8 inches (151 x 118.5 x 11 cm)
Michael Lin
Forever Shanghai, 2018
Acrylic and gold leaf wall painting
149 5/8 x 260 5/8 inches (380 x 662 cm)
Gordon Matta-Clark
Conical Intersect, 1975
Silver dye bleach print (Cibachrome)
29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches (75.6 x 100.3 cm)
Ming Wong
Next Year / L'Annee Prochaine, 2016
Single channel video
17:40 mins
Location 
Opening reception 
Friday, July 6, 6–8 PM

GMCT2149

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Four parts 22 x 27 1/2 inches (55.9 x 69.9 cm)
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Gelatin silver prints
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Bronx Floor: Boston Road, 1973

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41 x 31 inches (104.1 x 78.7 cm)
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Collaged gelatin silver prints
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Splitting

Year 
1974
Basel Additional Info 

GORDON MATTA-CLARK

Splitting, 1974

Collaged gelatin silver prints
41 x 31 inches (104.1 x 78.7 cm)
Framed: 41 x 31 inches (104.1 x 78.7 cm)

Gordon Matta-Clark's (1943-1978) practice during the 1970s introduced new and radical modes of physically exploring and subverting urban architecture. Splitting, 1974, documents one of his first iconic "cut" pieces, in which the artist, along with several friends, laboriously sliced open an abandoned twostory house that was slated for demolition in Englewood, New Jersey, during the spring of 1974. Over a period of several months, Matta-Clark made two parallel vertical cuts through all of the house's structural surfaces; he then removed several of the foundation blocks on which it stood, making one half of the house lean slightly away from the other, creating a wedge-shaped interstice between the two sides. Before the building was demolished and removed in September 1974, he also extracted the four upper corners of the structure, subsequently exhibiting them as freestanding works of art (now in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art).

The transformation of this vacant, quintessential suburban home, which for Matta-Clark represented the decay of the American dream, generated a series of uncanny and somewhat vertiginous photographs. In the present work, a unique collage, Matta-Clark has combined photographic fragments to create a disorienting perspective of his building cuts. The formal and thematic sensibility of this image expresses the artist's ingenuity in regard to the convergence of photography and the medium of architecture. His photocollages express the multiplicity of perspectives that his architectural cuts afford.

Like many artists of his generation (most notably Robert Smithson), Matta-Clark expressed a pronounced fascination with the temporal qualities of architecture and the art object. Nearly all of the architectural cuts he produced were ephemeral and survive only in film or photographic form; Splitting is one such work. A related photo-collage also titled Splitting is in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

GMCT1039

Availability 
None
Artists 
Dimensions 
Framed: 41 x 31 inches (104.1 x 78.7 cm)
Materials 
Collaged gelatin silver prints
Images format 
Thumbnail
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Grey display
Front title 

Splitting

Year 
1974

Concurrent with A W-Hole House, is a show of Matta-Clark's drawings at Zwirner & Wirth. This exhibition examines the range of work from the artist's earliest studies of the movement of energy flowing through structures such as trees, to more abstract circuitry, and from theoretical architectural studies to actual proposals, such as those for the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Also included are several of the artist's Cut Drawing Pads, demonstrating the artist's unique approach to graphic art using a jigsaw rather than a pen. One such work, Infraform, includes photos of a project which was executed in Milan during the same period the A W-Hole House project.

 

From the beginning, Matta-Clark's methods explored and fused different media: architecture, performance, sculpture, drawing, photography, and film. In both his art and his attitude, he sought a more open society, and proposed a new way of seeing rather than altering his environment. He focused on the commonplace and the "throw-aways" such as the city's many abandoned buildings. In cutting through walls and traditional art rules, he transformed examples of urban blight into art.

 

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