The new sculptural works by Richard Serra will be on view through December 22.

 

David Zwirner is pleased to present two major new works in forged steel by Richard Serra. Recent drawings by the artist will be on view in the gallery’s second floor exhibition spaces. 

 

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© 2017 Richard Serra / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

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Richard Serra
Rotterdam Horizontal #5 / Right Angle, 2016
Etching ink, silica, and paintstick on handmade paper
43 1/4 x 31 1/2 inches (109.9 x 80 cm)
Richard Serra
Right Angle #1, 2017
Etching ink, silica, and paintstick on handmade paper
27 3/4 x 27 3/4 inches (70.5 x 70.5 cm)
Rotterdam Vertical #10
Etching ink, silica, and paintstick on handmade paper
39 x 39 1/4 inches (99.1 x 99.7 cm)
Richard Serra
AR Vertical #4, 2017
Etching ink, silica, and paintstick on handmade paper
40 1/4 x 39 1/2 inches (102.2 x 100.3 cm)
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Ruth Asawa
Continuous (S.340, Hanging, Miniature Single-Lobed, Three Layered Continuous Form within a Form), c. 1981-1982
Hanging sculpture—gold-filled wire
3 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches
(8.9 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)
©  Estate of Ruth Asawa
 

David Zwirner is pleased to announce the gallery's first exhibition dedicated to the work of Ruth Asawa since having announced the representation of the artist's estate earlier this year, which will take place at the 537 West 20th Street location. The exhibition will bring together a selection of key sculptures, paintings, and works on paper spanning Asawa's influential practice, as well as rare archival materials, including a group of vintage photographs of the artist and her work by Imogen Cunningham. 

 

Born in rural California, Asawa began to make art while detained in internment camps for Japanese Americans at Santa Anita, California, and Rohwer, Arkansas, where she was sent with her family in 1942-1943. Following her release, she enrolled in Milwaukee State Teachers College, eventually making her way to Black Mountain College in North Carolina in 1946, then known for its progressive pedagogical methods and avant-garde aesthetic milieu. Asawa's time at Black Mountain proved formative in her development as an artist, and she was influenced there in particular by her teachers Josef Albers, Buckminster Fuller, and the mathematician Max Dehn.

 

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

 

 

 

 

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Ad Reinhardt: Blue Paintings, organized by the Ad Reinhardt Foundation, will present the largest number of the artist’s “blue” paintings ever shown together. Drawn exclusively from museum and private collections, this will be the first exhibition devoted entirely to this body of work since the artist’s 1965 solo show at the Stable Gallery, New York, over fifty years ago. This presentation will focus on works made between 1950 and 1953, in addition to related earlier canvases from the 1940s.

 

The perceptual demands of these compelling works are intense and reward sustained looking: the blues in Reinhardt’s paintings appear to change before one’s eyes, influenced by subtle shifts in color within each canvas and in neighboring works. Reinhardt paired tones of blue that are so similar that it may take minutes to see they are not the same, creating resonant compositions that challenge the limits of perception. In bringing these works together, this exhibition will afford a rare opportunity to experience one of the greatest twentieth-century painters thinking in color.

 

The Ad Reinhardt Foundation would like extend its deep gratitude to the many generous lenders who have made this unprecedented exhibition possible. Ad Reinhardt: Blue Paintings, which is free and open to the public, will introduce a new audience to these iconic works, and has already contributed immensely to the study of the artist’s oeuvre. 

 

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Above, from left to right: Abstract Painting, 1950-51. Oil and acrylic on canvas. 78 1/4 x 24 inches (198.8 x 61 cm). Private Collection, Courtesy Pace Gallery. Blue Painting, 1951-1953. Oil on canvas. 80 x 59 7/8 inches (203.2 x 152.1 cm). Private Collection, Europe. No. 15, 1952. Oil on canvas. 110 9/16 x 42 1/2 inches (280.8 x 108 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1958, K1958:42. All artwork © 2017 The Ad Reinhardt Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ad Reinhardt in his studio, 1953. Works on view in the current exhibition include Number 88, 1950 (Blue), 1950 (far left; now in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. (far left); and No. 15, 1952 (directly to the left of the artist; now in the collection of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo). Artwork © Ad Reinhardt Foundation. Photo © Walter Rosenblum.
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On the occasion of the recent announcement that David Zwirner and Andrea Rosen Gallery will co-represent the Estate of Felix Gonzalez-Torres, David Zwirner is pleased to announce the gallery's first exhibition dedicated to the artist's influential work.

 

Felix Gonzalez-Torres is one of the most significant artists to emerge in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In its reduced formal vocabulary, conceptual rigor, and evocative use of everyday materials, the artist's work resonates with meaning that is at once specific and mutable; rigorous and generous; poetic and political.

 

Drawn from museum and private collections, the exhibition spans several bodies of work from throughout the artist's career, presented in a series of distinct installations in nine spaces on two floors of the gallery's 537 West 20th Street location. The installations range from intimate to expansive and respond to the physical architecture and the simultaneously private and public nature of the gallery. Together, in their radical openness to interventions of site, audience, and context, the works on view challenge perceived notions of what constitutes an exhibition space, a public, an artwork itself.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

 

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Felix Gonzalez-Torres
"Untitled" (Perfect Lovers), 1987-1990
Wall clocks
13 1/2 x 27 x 1 1/4 inches overall. Two parts: 13 1/2 inches diameter each
Felix Gonzalez-Torres
"Untitled" (Water), 1995
Strands of beads and hanging device
Dimensions vary with installation
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David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of works by John McCracken at the gallery's 537 West 20th Street location in New York. Drawn primarily from the last decade of the artist's career, the works on view explore varying articulations of seriality within the artist's diverse oeuvre, and the way in which he engaged formal concerns, such as verticality, surface, and particularly color, as a means of composing simple, but deeply resonant sculptures and installations.

 

McCracken occupies a singular position within the recent history of American art, as his work melds the restrained formal qualities of Minimalist sculpture with a distinctly West Coast sensibility expressed through color, form, and finish. He developed his early sculptural work while studying painting at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland in the late 1950s and early 1960s. While experimenting with increasingly three-dimensional canvases, the artist began to produce objects made with industrial materials, including plywood, sprayed lacquer, and pigmented resin, creating the highly reflective, smooth surfaces that he was to become known for.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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John McCracken
Space, 2008
Polyester resin, fiberglass, and plywood in five (5) parts
96 x 72 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches (243.8 x 184.2 x 34.3 cm)
John McCracken
Flare, 2008
Polyester resin, fiberglass, and plywood in five (5) parts
96 x 72 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches (243.8 x 184.2 x 34.3 cm)
John McCracken
Sketchbook II, Pages 66-66 1/2, 1966
Pencil, colored pencil, and ink on paper
13 5/8 x 10 1/2 inches (34.6 x 26.7 cm)
John McCracken
Arc, 2005
Polyester resin, fiberglass, and plywood
94 x 20 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches (238.8 x 52.1 x 34.3 cm)
John McCracken
Mara, 2005
Polyester resin, fiberglass, and plywood
94 x 22 x 13 inches (238.8 x 55.9 x 33 cm)
John McCracken
Wave, 2004
Polyester resin, fiberglass, and plywood
96 x 30 x 16 inches (243.8 x 76.2 x 40.6 cm)
John McCracken
Siskiyou, 1988
Polyester resin, fiberglass, and plywood
96 x 27 x 14 inches (243.8 x 68.6 x 35.6 cm)
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Trained as a painter, Al Taylor (1948-1999) is best known for his three-dimensional constructions incorporating everyday materials, such as broomsticks, hula hoops, Plexiglas, and fishing floats, as well as his related drawings and prints.

 

Taylor created paintings until 1985, when he began making three-dimensional works. Borrowing from disparate styles, these canvases do not fit into any one category, but rather reveal a playful tension between flatness and depth, figuration and abstraction that is wholly Taylor's own. For the poet and critic John Yau, these virtually unknown canvases are a canny response to the painterly schisms of the time. He writes, "Taylor found a way to embrace divergent and even antagonistic impulses, and build upon them; this was his way of going forward...He never sought the easy way out."

 

This exhibition—the first to focus exclusively on Taylor's paintings—is a rare opportunity to see a selection of works made between 1971 and 1980 which have never been shown before.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Al Taylor
Breakman, 1978
Acrylic on canvas
32 x 26 1/8 inches (81.3 x 66.4 cm)
Al Taylor
Mendoza, 1980
Acrylic and oil on canvas
82 3/4 x 42 inches (210.2 x 106.7 cm)
Al Taylor
Untitled, c. 1977-1978
Acrylic on canvas
40 7/8 x 15 7/8 inches (103.8 x 40.3 cm)
Al Taylor
Egyptian Painting, 1978
Acrylic and oil on canvas
72 x 36 inches (182.9 x 91.4 cm)
Al Taylor
Helen, 1976
Acrylic on two (2) canvas panels
54 1/4 x 72 1/4 inches (137.8 x 183.5 cm)
Al Taylor
Untitled, c. 1974-1975
Acrylic on canvas
72 x 48 inches (182.9 x 121.9 cm)
Al Taylor
Thinking About It, 1980
Acrylic on canvas
90 x 40 inches (228.6 x 101.6 cm)
Al Taylor
Untitled, c. 1978-1979
Acrylic on canvas
72 1/8 x 48 inches (183.2 x 121.9 cm)
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One of the most significant Korean artists of the twentieth century, Yun Hyong-keun (1928-2007) completed his studies in Seoul following the Korean War. From the 1960s onwards, he became associated with the influential Dansaekhwa or "monochrome painting" movement, which prioritized technique and process.

 

Using a restricted palette, Yun applied layers of pigment to raw canvas in vertical or horizontal bands interspersed with blank space; working on his studio floor, he diluted the paint with turpentine so that it would gradually bleed into the support. On a visit to New York in 1974, Yun met Donald Judd, who was to host his first solo exhibitions in the United States at his spaces at 101 Spring Street in New York and at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa in Texas during the 1990s.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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Yun Hyong-keun
Burnt Umber & Ultramarine, 1976
Oil on linen
71 1/2 x 90 1/4 x 1 1/4 inches (181.6 x 229.2 x 3.2 cm)
Yun Hyong-keun
Umber-Blue, 1977
Oil on cotton
80 5/8 x 55 3/4 x 1 1/4 inches (204.8 x 141.6 x 3.2 cm)
Yun Hyong-keun
Burnt Umber & Ultramarine, 1978
Oil on cotton
72 1/2 x 90 3/4 x 1 1/4 inches (184.2 x 230.5 x 3.2 cm)
Yun Hyong-keun
Umber-Blue, 1978
Oil on linen
110 1/4 x 59 3/8 x 1 1/4 inches (280 x 150.8 x 3.2 cm)
Yun Hyong-keun
Burnt Umber & Ultramarine Blue, 1988
Oil on linen
89 1/4 x 63 3/4 x 1 7/8 inches (226.7 x 161.9 x 4.8 cm)
Yun Hyong-keun
Umber, 1988-1989
Oil on linen
80 3/4 x 131 1/4 x 2 3/4 inches (205.1 x 333.4 x 7 cm)
Yun Hyong-keun
Burnt Umber, 1989
Oil on linen
81 x 131 1/4 x 2 3/4 inches (205.7 x 333.4 x 7 cm)
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David Zwirner is pleased to present Cut, Folded, Pressed & Other Actions at the gallery's 537 West 20th Street location. This group exhibition will highlight modern and contemporary artists who utilize paper as a site of rigorous formal and conceptual inquiry through direct manipulation and engagement with its materiality. The exhibition includes work by Noriko Ambe, Hans Bischoffshausen, Enrico Castellani, Célia Euvaldo,Fernanda Gomes, Oskar Holweck, Vlatka Horvat, Sol LeWitt, Marco Maggi, Anna Maria Maiolino, Gordon Matta-Clark, Eleanore Mikus, Joshua Neustein, Arthur Luiz Piza, Fred Sandback, Mira Schendel, Günther Uecker, and Ignacio Uriarte, among others.

 

Paper, the traditional support of drawing, came to occupy a particular position in conceptual and minimalist practices during the 1960s and 1970s with the rising interest in process and materials. Given the ubiquity and malleability of the medium, artists have continued to interrogate its fundamental properties, formal qualities, and its broader artistic and cultural associations. As the title of the exhibition suggests, many of the works on view evidence the active hand of the artist on and within their very surface, thereby complicating notions of drawing as necessarily dictated by conventional modes of mark-making or graphic lines. In the artists' arrangement of paper in space or in the deliberate manipulation of the sheet(s) using a wide range of aesthetic tactics such as tearing, puncturing, rolling, and pressing, these monochromatic works present subtle and varied investigations of light, space, composition, and materials.

 

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For more information about available works contact inquiries@davidzwirner.com

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