LUOJR0002_vr

Price 
$3600.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
29 7/8 x 6 3/4 x 10 5/8 inches (76 x 17 x 27 cm)
Materials 
Plaster, titanium powder, abalone shell, crystal mineral, doorstop, air harden clay, acrylic paint, insulation cotton, plywood, and wheels
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Foam to Form

Year 
2015-2016
Basel Additional Info 

Luo Jr-Shin
Foam to Form, 2015-2016
Plaster, titanium powder, abalone shell, crystal mineral, doorstop, air hardened clay, acrylic paint, insulation cotton, plywood, toy egg, and wheels
29 7/8 x 6 3/4 x 10 5/8 inches
76 x 17 x 27 cm
Certificate of Authenticity
LUOJR0002

Luo Jr-Shin’s (b. 1984) work is characterized by an experimentation with a variety of traditional and unconventional materials. Ranging from clay, resin, and metal, to food, chemicals, and scents, these substances are vehicles through which the artist investigates the underlying spirituality and human condition in our representational world.

This work considers the aesthetic possibilities of Styrofoam, a material more commonly associated with packaging. As Wang Po-Wei notes, “In Foam to Form, the artist represents styrofoam by casting it in plaster, which separates it from the context of its functionality in daily life and propels it into the tradition of art. This form of petrification allows the viewer to keep their experience untarnished by the significance of functional objects; it is a means of cleansing art and ridding it of any interference from the original medium itself. This technique does not make a ready-made object a part of the work, nor is it taking styrofoam and directly placing it into the exhibition space. It is truly, as its name suggests, turning foam (styrofoam) into form, with a particular emphasis on foam. Petrifying styrofoam is a strategy of magnifying form itself amidst the differences between medium and form.”1

Wang Po-Wei, “Between Perception and Art: Luo Jr-Shin Questions Concerning the Forms in Foam to Form,” in Urban Synesthesia. Exh. cat. (Kaohsiung, Taiwan: Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, 2015). 

Exhibitions
Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Urban Synesthesia, October 17, 2015 - January 10, 2016.

Taipei, VT Artsalon, Slide, Don’t Slip – A Solo Exhibition of Luo Jr-shin, April 16 - May 21, 2016.

Taipei, Michael Ku Gallery, Even though the future may be far away, Even though saying good bye needs not be at an airport, If only you could describe a future, March 11 - May 6, 2018.

 

LUOJR0001_vr

Price 
$4500.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
44 7/8 x 13 3/4 x 11 1/4 inches (114 x 35 x 28.5 cm)
Materials 
Plaster, titanium powder, stainless steel handle, air harden clay, acrylic, and pillow
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Foam to Form

Year 
2015-2016
Basel Additional Info 

Luo Jr-Shin
Foam to Form, 2015-2016
Plaster, titanium powder, stainless steel handle, air hardened clay, acrylic, and pillow
44 7/8 x 13 3/4 x 11 1/4 inches
114 x 35 x 28.5 cm
Certificate of Authenticity
LUOJR0001

Luo Jr-Shin’s (b. 1984) work is characterized by an experimentation with a variety of traditional and unconventional materials. Ranging from clay, resin, and metal, to food, chemicals, and scents, these substances are vehicles through which the artist investigates the underlying spirituality and human condition in our representational world. 

This work considers the aesthetic possibilities of Styrofoam, a material more commonly associated with packaging. As Wang Po-Wei notes, “In Foam to Form, the artist represents styrofoam by casting it in plaster, which separates it from the context of its functionality in daily life and propels it into the tradition of art. This form of petrification allows the viewer to keep their experience untarnished by the significance of functional objects; it is a means of cleansing art and ridding it of any interference from the original medium itself. This technique does not make a ready-made object a part of the work, nor is it taking styrofoam and directly placing it into the exhibition space. It is truly, as its name suggests, turning foam (styrofoam) into form, with a particular emphasis on foam. Petrifying styrofoam is a strategy of magnifying form itself amidst the differences between medium and form.”1

Wang Po-Wei, “Between Perception and Art: Luo Jr-Shin Questions Concerning the Forms in Foam to Form,” in Urban Synesthesia. Exh. cat. (Kaohsiung, Taiwan: Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, 2015). 

Exhibitions
Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Urban Synesthesia, October 17, 2015 - January 10, 2016.

Taipei, VT Artsalon, Slide, Don’t Slip – A Solo Exhibition of Luo Jr-shin, April 16 - May 21, 2016.

Taipei, Michael Ku Gallery, Even though the future may be far away, Even though saying good bye needs not be at an airport, If only you could describe a future, March 11 - May 6, 2018.

 

AJIAO0002_vr

Price 
$5000.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
77 3/8 x 5 x 5 inches (196.4 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm)
Materials 
Metal structure with UV print
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Windows Gravestone No.18

Year 
2016
Basel Additional Info 

aaajiao
Windows Gravestone No. 18, 2016
Metal structure with UV print
77 3/8 x 5 x 5 inches
196.4 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm
Certificate of Authenticity
AJIAO0002

Active online as a media artist, blogger, activist, and programmer, aaajiao is the virtual persona of Xu Wenkai (b. 1984). Interested in the role that technology plays in our everyday lives, aaajiao approaches his multidisciplinary work through a dystopian lens, addressing the Internet at large, data processing, the blogosphere, and China’s Great Firewall. Through his various projects, aaajiao captures the impact of rapid advancements in cyber technology and social media platforms on present generations.

This work belongs to the artist’s Windows Gravestone series of metal sculptures imprinted with screenshots that he manipulates, including menu bars and desktop backgrounds, from various Microsoft Windows computers dating from the 1980s to the year 2000. These autonomous works also serve as monuments to obsolete technology. As the artist notes, “Windows Gravestone studies all user interfaces . . . from the 1984 beta version to the 2000 Windows operating system, and highlights the fundamental aesthetic and fun components of user interfaces. I even think that now all the aesthetic value of the digital is derived from these operating systems.”1

Marianna Tsionki, “‘Remnants of an Electronic Past’: Chinese new media artist aaajiao – in conversation,” Art Radar (September 16, 2016), accessed online.

Exhibitions

Xi’an, China, OCAT, aaajiao: Remnants of an Electronic Past, June 18 - September 11, 2016. 

Shanghai, Yuz Museum, OVERPOP: New Art from the Yuz Collection and Beyond, September 4, 2016 - January 15, 2017.

AJIAO0001_vr

Price 
$7000.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
Dimension variable
Materials 
Ink and sponge roller
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

404

Year 
2017
Basel Additional Info 

aaajiao
404, 2017
Ink and sponge roller
Dimensions variable
Edition 2 of 5, 2 AP
Certificate of Authenticity
AJIAO0001.2

Active online as a media artist, blogger, activist, and programmer, aaajiao is the virtual persona of Xu Wenkai (b. 1984). Interested in the role that technology plays in our everyday lives, aaajiao approaches his multidisciplinary work through a dystopian lens, addressing the Internet at large, data processing, the blogosphere, and China’s Great Firewall. Through his various projects, aaajiao captures the impact of rapid advancements in cyber technology and social media platforms on present generations.

The title of this site-specific work refers to the error code that appears on blocked websites in China. Using a paint roller stenciled with the number 404, the artist translates this digital message into analog form, creating columns of intersecting error messages across the surface. As the artist notes, “404 does more than discuss censorship only. I wanted to speak the truth—which is hard for us (in China)—since we are surrounded by 404. It’s just a number on the one hand, but on the other it also represents a state of not being able to do anything.”1

1 Declan Eytan, “Berlin’s Thriving Contemporary Art Scene Is a Land of the Free, Home of the Brave,” Forbes (October 18, 2017), accessed online.

Exhibitions

(includes all editions)

Shanghai, Leo Xu Projects, aaajiao: User, Love, High-frequency Trading, May 27 - July 22, 2017.

Buenos Aires, BIENALSUR, Take Me (I’m Yours), September 13 - November 5, 2017.

Beijing, Magician Space, Access Through a Detour, January 19 - March 11, 2018.

Rome, Villa Medici, Take Me (I’m Yours), May 31 - August 15, 2018.

WANYI0005_vr

Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
Left panel: 23 5/8 x 11 3/4 inches (60 x 30 cm) Right panel: 23 5/8 x 11 3/4 inches (60 x 30 cm)
Materials 
Resin and acrylic on Dibond aluminum panels
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Panorama

Year 
2017-2018

WANYI0004_vr

Price 
$700.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
7 1/2 x 10 7/8 inches (19 x 27.5 cm)
Materials 
Graphite on paper
Images format 
Artwork
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Array

Year 
2017
Basel Additional Info 

Wang Yi
Array, 2017
Graphite on graph paper
7 1/2 x 10 7/8 inches
19 x 27.5 cm
Signed, titled, and dated recto
WANYI0004

Wang Yi (b. 1991) is known for his use of handmade pigments on a range of supports including canvas, aluminum plates, and mirrors. His methodical works, created by applying layers of paint over long stretches of time, are an homage to traditional painting practices and a comment on the passage of time. Often using a limited palette of two or three colors, Wang produces geometric abstractions and minimal works that are at once restrained and dynamic, pure and complex.

This small-scale work on paper belongs to the artist’s Array series, begun in 2017, which brings together various geometric patterns onto a single surface. Using the individual units of graph paper as a guide, Wang creates a dizzying array of designs that leap in and out of focus. Related to the artist’s Hub and Cells series, begun in 2012 and 2016, respectively, Array represents both the infinite and the infinitesimal, recurring themes in his oeuvre. 

WANYI0003_vr

Price 
$4300.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
19 5/8 x 19 5/8 inches (50 x 50 cm)
Materials 
Acrylic on canvas
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Cell

Year 
2018
Basel Additional Info 

Wang Yi
Cell, 2018
Acrylic on canvas
19 5/8 x 19 5/8 inches
50 x 50 cm
Signed verso
WANYI0003

Wang Yi (b. 1991) is known for his use of handmade pigments on a range of supports including canvas, aluminum plates, and mirrors. His methodical works, created by applying layers of paint over long stretches of time, are an homage to traditional painting practices and a comment on the passage of time. Often using a limited palette of two or three colors, Wang produces geometric abstractions and minimal works that are at once restrained and dynamic, pure and complex.

This work belongs to the artist’s Cell series, begun in 2016, which was developed out of his large-scale Hub paintings that overlap several compositions within a unified plane. With his Cell paintings, the artist singles out individual geometric shapes and repeats them across the canvas, creating a grid-like structure that appears mechanically produced, though upon closer inspection, reveals the fastidious process through which it was made.

Describing his painting practice as a whole, the artist notes: “I minimize the painting elements (color, composition, brushwork, symbols, etc.), which are used in the paintings, to try to create the purity of painting itself in this way. The colors I usually use are three primary colors or contrasting colors and complementary colors; the composition . . . is symmetrical or divided equally. Instead of creating an abstract symbol, I divide the big structure into smaller geometric color lumps. In the process, I follow the ‘glazing’ which is used in Chinese and western traditional painting, which is quite a slow technique; the visual effect that is achieved after hundreds of glaze is trembling but stable. It is also part of my backtracking and salute to the tradition, although the painting reflects a modern geometric abstraction.”1

1 Carol Wang, “Returning to Tradition: An Interview with Chinese Artist Wang Yi,” The Artling (June 6, 2018), accessed online.

WANYI0002_vr

Price 
$7000.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
31 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches (80 x 80 cm)
Materials 
Acrylic on canvas
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Cell

Year 
2017
Basel Additional Info 

Wang Yi
Cell, 2017
Acrylic on canvas
31 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches
80 x 80 cm
Signed verso
WANYI0002

Wang Yi (b. 1991) is known for his use of handmade pigments on a range of supports including canvas, aluminum plates, and mirrors. His methodical works, created by applying layers of paint over long stretches of time, are an homage to traditional painting practices and a comment on the passage of time. Often using a limited palette of two or three colors, Wang produces geometric abstractions and minimal works that are at once restrained and dynamic, pure and complex.

This work belongs to the artist’s Cell series, begun in 2016, which was developed out of his large-scale Hub paintings that overlap several compositions within a unified plane. With his Cell paintings, the artist singles out individual geometric shapes and repeats them across the canvas, creating a grid-like structure that appears mechanically produced, though upon closer inspection, reveals the fastidious process through which it was made.

Describing his painting practice as a whole, the artist notes: “I minimize the painting elements (color, composition, brushwork, symbols, etc.), which are used in the paintings, to try to create the purity of painting itself in this way. The colors I usually use are three primary colors or contrasting colors and complementary colors; the composition . . . is symmetrical or divided equally. Instead of creating an abstract symbol, I divide the big structure into smaller geometric color lumps. In the process, I follow the ‘glazing’ which is used in Chinese and western traditional painting, which is quite a slow technique; the visual effect that is achieved after hundreds of glaze is trembling but stable. It is also part of my backtracking and salute to the tradition, although the painting reflects a modern geometric abstraction.”1

Carol Wang, “Returning to Tradition: An Interview with Chinese Artist Wang Yi,” The Artling (June 6, 2018), accessed online.

WANYI0001_vr

Price 
$7000.00
Availability 
Available
Artists 
Dimensions 
31 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches (80 x 80 cm)
Materials 
Acrylic on canvas
Images format 
Thumbnail
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Cell

Year 
2017
Basel Additional Info 

Wang Yi
Cell, 2017
Acrylic on canvas
31 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches
80 x 80 cm
Signed verso
WANYI0001

Wang Yi (b. 1991) is known for his use of handmade pigments on a range of supports including canvas, aluminum plates, and mirrors. His methodical works, created by applying layers of paint over long stretches of time, are an homage to traditional painting practices and a comment on the passage of time. Often using a limited palette of two or three colors, Wang produces geometric abstractions and minimal works that are at once restrained and dynamic, pure and complex.

This work belongs to the artist’s Cell series, begun in 2016, which was developed out of his large-scale Hub paintings that overlap several compositions within a unified plane. With his Cell paintings, the artist singles out individual geometric shapes and repeats them across the canvas, creating a grid-like structure that appears mechanically produced, though upon closer inspection, reveals the fastidious process through which it was made.

Describing his painting practice as a whole, the artist notes: “I minimize the painting elements (color, composition, brushwork, symbols, etc.), which are used in the paintings, to try to create the purity of painting itself in this way. The colors I usually use are three primary colors or contrasting colors and complementary colors; the composition . . . is symmetrical or divided equally. Instead of creating an abstract symbol, I divide the big structure into smaller geometric color lumps. In the process, I follow the ‘glazing’ which is used in Chinese and western traditional painting, which is quite a slow technique; the visual effect that is achieved after hundreds of glaze is trembling but stable. It is also part of my backtracking and salute to the tradition, although the painting reflects a modern geometric abstraction.”1

1 Carol Wang, “Returning to Tradition: An Interview with Chinese Artist Wang Yi,” The Artling (June 6, 2018), accessed online.

LENLA0006_vr

Price 
$2200.00
Availability 
Inquire
Artists 
Dimensions 
Dimensions vary with installation
Materials 
Single channel video, 2:12 min, color, sound
Additional 

Edition 1 of 5, 2 AP

Images format 
Artwork
Images display 
Grey display
Front title 

Untitled, (Whitney)

Year 
2018

Pages

Subscribe to David Zwirner RSS