Opening on April 5, 2007, Zwirner & Wirth will present the only existing complete set of prints and multiples by German artist Blinky Palermo.

 

Blinky Palermo (1943-1977) has left behind a uniquely influential legacy as an artist, despite the tragically short span of his career. Though it has been linked with distinct 20th Century art practices–which include abstraction, minimalism, and conceptual art, Palermo's diverse body of work defies easy categorization.

 

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Opening on May 9, 2007, Zwirner & Wirth will present an exhibition of American and European conceptual photography drawn from a private collection. Spanning the years 1964-1989, the collection, which has been amassed over the last three decades, includes key examples of photo-based conceptual art by artists such as Vito Acconci, Giovanni Anselmo, John Baldessari, Bernd & Hilla Becher, Mel Bochner, Hans Breder, Marcel Broodthaers, Peter Campus, Robert Cumming, Valie Export, Fischli & Weiss, Dan Graham, Birgit Jürgenssen, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ana Mendieta, Bruce Nauman, Meret Oppenheim, Hélio Oiticica, Giulio Paolini, Giuseppe Penone, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, Charles Ray, Allen Ruppersberg, Lucas Samaras, Laurie Simmons, Andy Warhol, and others.

 

An open-ended term, "conceptual art" encompasses a broad range of practices that emphasize the role of ideas in the production of artistic meaning. Beginning roughly in the 1960s and 70s, artists would question the traditional visual or aesthetic definition of the work of art in favor of more idea-driven, critical work. Photography would become central in the development of conceptual practices, as it proved to be a medium that could be implemented by artists in various ways, and the exhibition at Zwirner & Wirth will reflect a broad range of influential, conceptual photo-based work.

 

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Zwirner & Wirth is pleased to present an exhibition of Outdoor Sculpture at David Zwirner's 519 West 19th Street gallery space. The works on view will include a selection of works spanning the years 1969 to 2006 by Carl Andre, Mark di Suvero, Robert Gober, Sol LeWitt, John McCracken, and Franz West.

 

The works on view will explore the development of sculptural concerns that were uniquely addressed by these artists, showing how traditional, monumental sculpture was transformed to include work that expanded the relationship of sculpture to the space of the viewer. By the 1960s, the notion of sculpture as a static, pedestal-based medium that idealized and monumentalized its subject matter was radically extended to include works that addressed their physical and temporal surroundings. These concerns would continue to be developed by a range of artists over the course of the pursuant decades and, moreover, would be examined within the broader context of the outdoors.

 

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Opening on May 11, 2007, David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of drawings by American artist R. Crumb, who lives and works in the south of France. Crumb's work is currently the focus of a solo exhibition entitled R. Crumb's Underground at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, CA. He has had oneperson exhibitions at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2005) and the Ludwig Museum, Cologne, Germany (2004). His numerous group exhibitions include La Famille d’Artistes: Exposition Crumb, Le Musée de Serignan, Serignan, France (2007); Masters of American Comics, The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA (traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; The Jewish Museum, New York, NY; and Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI); Contemporary Erotic Drawing, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT; Experiencing Duration, Lyon Biennial of Contemporary Art, Lyon, France (all 2005); Beautiful Losers, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, CA and additional venues; Disparities and Deformations: Our Grotesque, SITE Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM; and 2004 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA (all 2004), among others. This will be R. Crumb's first exhibition at David Zwirner and will include figurative works from as early as 1972 and as recent as 2006.

 

R. Crumb emerged in the late 1960s as the leading figure in underground illustration, with drawings that are a sometimes caustic combination of 1930s comic strip style and post-Vietnam counterculture themes. Although he did not align himself with "hippie" ideologies–in fact, he has consistently disowned the connection–Crumb is the movement's reluctant poster child. Inspired by Thomas Nast, Honoré Daumier, T.S. Sullivant, James Gillray and others, his 40-year career is marked by an astonishingly prolific work ethic (he draws constantly and compulsively) and rigorous experimentation in a wide variety of media. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he contributed to countless underground comics, including Zap Comix, Weirdo, and Arcade. In addition to a brief foray into painting in the 1980s, Crumb, entirely self-taught, has produced LPs, CDs, and sculptures. Best known for his works on paper, he is widely regarded as one of the most skillful portrait artists alive.

 

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Opening on May 14, 2007, David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Chinese artist Yan PeiMing, who divides his time between Shanghai, China and Dijon, France. In 2006, Yan Pei-Ming was the subject of a oneperson exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, Saint-Étienne, France. He had solo exhibitions at the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China; Guangdong Museum of Art, Guangzhou, China (both 2005); Kunsthalle Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany (2004); Fils du Dragon, Portraits chinois, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Dijon, France; Portraits de Mao, Musée des Beaux-Arts et d’Archéologie, Besançon, France; and Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Geneva, Switzerland (all 2003). The artist's many prestigious group exhibitions include The Unhomely, Phantom Scenes in Global Society, 2nd Biennale International of Contemporary Art, Seville, Spain (2006); A propos du Lingchi (supplice des cents morceaux), with Huang Yong-Ping, Musée Denon, Chalon-sur-Saône, France; Moi–Autoportraits du XXe siècle, Musée du Luxembourg, Paris, France (both 2004); New Zone–Chinese Art, Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, Poland (2003); the Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2003 and 1995); and Lyon Biennial, Lyon France (2000 and 1997). This will be Yan Pei-Ming's first exhibition in New York.

 

Best known for his larger-than-life self portraits, as well as paintings of political and cultural icons such as Mao Tse-Tung and Bruce Lee, Yan Pei-Ming has emerged in recent years as one of the most dynamic and experimental Chinese painters. Before moving from his native Shanghai to France in 1980, Yan Pei-Ming painted landscapes and portraits of peasant workers. Since then, his subjects have included anonymous figures, his father, Buddha, and a series of prostitutes, all concurrent with an on-going body of self-portraits. Although the genre of portraiture is not commonly encountered in Chinese art, it manifests with both Eastern and Western sensibilities in Yan Pei-Ming's works. His expressive style and controlled palette reflect a connection to the aesthetic and cultural climate of China as well as the influence of 20th-century American conceptual art. His canvases are typically mono- or bi-chromatic and painted with large brushes (sometimes a broom), in either black and white or deep shades of red. With a mastered economy of marks, he delineates his compositions with broad, sweeping gestures and visible drips, resulting in images that dissolve into near-abstraction at close view.

 

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Opening on October 18, 2006, David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of recent paintings by Belgian artist Raoul De Keyser. In 2004, De Keyser was the subject of a major solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London, England, which traveled to the Musée de Rochechouart, Rochechouart, France; De Pont Museum for Contemporary Art, Tilburg, The Netherlands; Fundãçao Serralves, Museu de Arte Contemporãnea, Porto, Portugal; and Kunstverein St. Gallen Kunstmuseum, St. Gallen, Switzerland (all 2004). Other important solo exhibitions include S.M.A.K., Ghent, Belgium (2001); The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (2000); and Kunstmuseum Luzern, Luzern, Switzerland (1999). De Keyser has participated in numerous prestigious group exhibitions, including LUZ, Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium (2005); Friedrich Christian Flick Collection im Hamburger Bahnhof, Hamburger Banhof-Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, Germany (2004); Painting on the Move, Museum fur Gegenwartskunst, Basel, Switzerland (2002); Mixing Memory and Desire, Neues Kunstmuseum Luzern, Luzern, Switzerland (2000); and Der zerbrochene Spiegel. Positionen zur Malerei, Messepalast & Kuntsthalle, Vienna, Austria (traveled to Deichtorhallen, Hamburg, Germany) (1992). This will be the artist's third solo exhibition at the gallery.

 

Born in 1930, Raoul de Keyser is one of Europe's leading painters. In the mid-1960s, he was a member of Nieuwe Visie (New Vision), a group of painters who sought to reinvigorate certain aspects of European formalism by taking ordinary subjects and reducing them to simple flat shapes and lines. Having exhibited widely since then, de Keyser gained international recognition at Documenta IX in Kassel, Germany in 1992. He is known in Belgium as the father of contemporary painting, and his work has greatly influenced a generation of younger artists such as Tomma Abts, Rebecca Morris, and Luc Tuymans.

 

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Louis-Léopold Boilly, Michaël Borremans, Paul Bril, Glenn Brown, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Jan Brueghel the Younger, Lucas Cranach the Elder, John Currin, Berlinde de Bruyckere, Carlo Dolci, Battista Dossi, Hilary Harkness, Julie Heffernan, Karen Kilimnik, Master of Female Half-Lengths, Christopher Orr, Djordje Ozbolt, Elizabeth Peyton, Michael Raedecker, Wilhelm Sasnal, Anj Smith, Jacob Van Swanenburgh, Richard Wathen, Jakub Julian Ziolkowski, and others.

 

Opening on June 27, Zwirner & Wirth will present an exhibition of paintings by Old Master and contemporary artists.  Old School celebrates a re-engagement with Old Master modes of representation, which might be said to be a recent phenomenon in contemporary art.  A younger generation of artists looks to the past in works that re-define and re-contextualize the techniques, themes, and imagery of their art-historical predecessors, and Old School aims to present a dialogue between old and new with a selection of works spanning the 15th to the 21st centuries.

 

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Opening on October 18, 2006, David Zwirner and Zwirner & Wirth are pleased to present concurrent exhibitions of paintings and drawings by New York artist Lisa Yuskavage. Yuskavage had recent solo exhibitions at the Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City, Mexico (2006), the Centre d'Art Contemporain, Geneva, Switzerland (2001) and the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (2000). Major group exhibitions include the Fifth International Biennial: Disparities and Deformations, Our Grotesque, SITE Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM (2004); Supernova: Art of the 1990s from the Logan Collection, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA (2003); de Kooning to Today: Highlights from the Permanent Collection, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY (2003); 2000 Whitney Biennial, The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY (2000); and Greater New York, P.S.1/The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY (2000). In 2007, Yuskavage will participate in America Today: 300 Years of Art from the USA at the National Art Museum of China in Beijing. These will be the artist's first exhibitions at David Zwirner and Zwirner & Wirth.

 

Known for paintings of women, Lisa Yuskavage's images occupy the space between high and low; the sacred and the profane. Many of these new works explore a complex psychological direction–specifically, symbiotic relationships. Influenced in part by images that depict power struggles, including Baroque sculptures (specifically Gianlorenzo Bernini) and Giorgio de Chirico's late "Gladiator" paintings, Yuskavage's "figures" hover or climb upon one another–caught in embraces that appear to shift between tenderness and violence. Within these paradoxical relationships, it is often difficult to decipher what is real and what is imagined; what is weighted and what is weightless; what is made of paint and what transcends the medium entirely. Yuskavage's subtle degrees of fiction and representation culminate in questionable, unsettling quasi-realities.

 

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Lisa Yuskavage
Changing, 2005
Oil on linen
77 x 68 inches (195.6 x 172.7 cm)
Lisa Yuskavage
Still Life II, 2005
Oil on linen
20 x 16 1/2 inches (50.8 x 41.9 cm)
Lisa Yuskavage
Morning, 2004-2005
Oil on linen
70 x 60 inches (177.8 x 152.4 cm)
Lisa Yuskavage
Imprint, 2006
Oil on linen
48 x 32 inches (121.9 x 81.3 cm)

Opening on September 21, 2006, David Zwirner is pleased to present a major new sculpture by Los Angeles-based artist Yutaka Sone. It Seems Like Snow Leopard Island was featured in Sone's recent solo exhibition at the Kunsthalle Bern in Bern, Switzerland–the largest European presentation of the artist's work to date and the third in a trilogy of exhibitions including Yutaka Sone: X-Art Show at the Aspen Museum of Art, Aspen, CO and Yutaka Sone Forecast: Snow at The Renaissance Society at The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (all 2006).

 

Sone was the subject of the seminal exhibition Yutaka Sone: Jungle Island at the MOCA, Los Angeles, CA (2003). In 2002, he had a solo show entitled Travel to Double River Island at the Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Toyota City, Japan. In addition, Sone has participated in several major biennials, including the Whitney Biennial, New York, NY (2004), La Bienale di Venezia, Venice, Italy (2003), The 25th Biennal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (2002), 13th Biennale of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (2002), the Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey (2001), and Yokohama 2001: International Triennale of Contemporary Art, Yokohama, Japan (2001). This exhibition will inaugurate David Zwirner's new space at 519 West 19th Street.

 

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Not so long ago, the history of modern art appeared to move forward in a fairly orderly progression from one movement to another. There was something almost biblical about this progress–Impressionism begat Post Impressionism, Post Impressionism begat Cubism, Cubism begat Surrealism, Surrealism begat Abstract Expressionism, and so on. In this view, art moved forward by extending or reacting against the preceding set of reigning assumptions, yielding a pleasing linear development from one set of influences to the next.

 

Things began to get more complicated in the1960s and 70s, as art moved through a dizzying series of changes predicated, it seemed at times, on little more than an attitude of negation toward all that had gone before. Still, the dream of order held on through the 1980s, as Neo Expressionism begat Neo Geo and Neo Geo begat Simulationism.

 

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