Carol Bove
Upcoming Exhibition at David Zwirner
2018
24 Grafton Street, London

Carol Bove
June 8–August 4, 2018

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new sculptures by Carol Bove, marking her third solo show with the gallery. Spanning two floors of the 24 Grafton Street location in London, the exhibition will feature works that relate to the artist’s ongoing series of "collage sculptures" begun in 2016, characterized by square steel tubing that has been crushed and bent into soft folds that belie their material construction, then painted in a uniform color and variably combined with found pieces of scrap metal and a smooth, highly polished steel disk.

Current Museum Exhibition: Carol Bove at The Contemporary Austin
2017-2018
Solo presentation in the Betty and Edward Marcus Sculpture Park
Installation view, Carol Bove, The Contemporary Austin - Laguna Gloria, Austin, Texas, 2017. Artwork © Carol Bove. Image courtesy The Contemporary Austin. Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons.
 

November 18, 2017–November 2018

In its first ever exhibition devoted to a single artist in the sculpture park, The Contemporary Austin presents an outdoor installation of new and recent large-scale sculptures by Carol Bove.

Anchoring the exhibition in which Bove interprets a classical sculpture garden is one of the artist’s steel "glyph" works, From the Sun to Zurich (2016). Newly-commissioned examples of Bove's abstract steel "collage sculptures" painted with cyan, yellow, and orange pigments complete the installation.

Images: Installation view, Carol Bove, The Contemporary Austin - Laguna Gloria, Austin, Texas, 2017. Artwork © Carol Bove. Image courtesy The Contemporary Austin. Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons.

Who’s Afraid of the New Now? 40 Artists in Dialogue
2017
40th Anniversary of the New Museum in New York

December 2–3, 2017

Gallery artists Carol Bove, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon participated in Who's Afraid of the New Now?, a series of public conversations between artists whose work has shaped the identity of the New Museum in New York as part of the museum's 40th anniversary celebrations.

The title of the series referenced a work by Allen Ruppersberg, whose first New York survey exhibition was held at the museum in 1985. The talks took place on December 2 and December 3, 2017.

The conversation between George Condo and Jeff Koons was covered in ARTNEWS, including sound bites from Koons about his debut exhibition in New York—"I wanted people to have a feeling of coming across something that was in some ways better prepared to survive than yourself"—and Condo's recollections of working for Andy Warhol's Factory.

Earlier in 2017, the New Museum presented the major solo exhibition Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work, featuring over seven hundred drawings from the 1960s to the present and marking the artist's first museum survey in New York. In 2016, The Keeper featured a sculptural installation by Carol Bove created in response to the work of Carlo Scarpa. The New Museum also presented The New—Jeff Koons's first solo exhibition in New York—in 1980.

57th Venice Biennale
2017
The artist's works respond to the legacy of Alberto Giacometti
Carol Bove
Installation view of Women of Venice at the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Women of Venice at the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Women of Venice at the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Women of Venice at the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Women of Venice at the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Women of Venice at the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017)

May 13–November 26, 2017

For the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale, Carol Bove created an installation in response to the late figurative work of Alberto Giacometti. Curated by Philipp Kaiser, the Pavilion exhibition Women of Venice also featured the work of the artist duo Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler.

Bove's installation, which spanned an indoor and outdoor space, comprised nine steel sculptures including a "collage sculpture," seven bright cyan colored columnar structures, and a white glyph work.

Interviewed for Apollo magazine, the artist described how Giacometti's work has influenced her own: "He's one of my favorite artists, so it was insightful for Philipp to choose me because I don't always think it's so explicit in my work . . . I've been thinking about Giacometti a lot as somebody who has an interesting sense of the space between objects, or the suggested space around objects . . . "

Read more: further details about the exhibition and the artists' works in Aesthetica Magazine and e-flux

Publication: Polka Dots
2016
A behind-the-scenes look into Carol Bove's practice
Carol Bove: Polka Dots
Carol Bove: Polka Dots

Offering a unique glimpse into her studio, Polka Dots explores the process and work of Carol Bove.

Bove was closely involved in producing this publication designed by Joseph Logan, which is structured around a series of photographs taken by Andreas Laszlo Konrath on visits to her studio in Brooklyn. Through the photographs, the reader experiences not only the development of Bove's most recent body of work—referred to by the artist as "collage sculptures"—but also the materials and conditions that contribute to its creation. The sculptures are constructed from square steel tubing that has been crushed and shaped by Bove, scrap metal that she finds in the industrial environs of her studio in Red Hook, and shallow, highly polished discs. Painted in vivid colors, the sculptures appear lightweight and improvised despite their heavy materiality. In addition to Konrath's rich and intimate photographs, images of individual works are shown silhouetted out of their original contexts. In doing so, Bove aims to draw the viewer away from a typical experience of sculpture.

Released on the occasion of Bove's solo exhibition at David Zwirner in New York in 2016, Polka Dots features an essay by Johanna Burton charting the artist's fascination with process and commitment to disrupting traditional ways of seeing. Published by David Zwirner Books

Group Exhibitions in New York
2016
Carol Bove
Lingam installed as part of the Public Art Fund exhibition The Language of Things in City Hall Park, New York (2016)

Lingam, 2015
Petrified wood and steel
120 x 60 x 38 inches (305 x 152.5 x 96.5 cm)
Installation view of The Keeper at the New Museum, New York (2016)
Installation view of The Keeper at the New Museum, New York (2016)

Carol Bove was included in the Public Art Fund exhibition The Language of Things, on view in City Hall Park, New York during the summer of 2016. The exhibition featured works, including Bove's Lingam, that suggest different forms of coded communication. The sculpture combines petrified wood and industrial steel, two contrasting materials that appear throughout her work.

Bove was also included in the the New Museum exhibition The Keeper, on view during the summer of 2016. The show focused on works related to collection, archivization, and preservation. She installed an arrangement of her sculptures in dialogue with works by Carlo Scarpa, as she had previously done on a larger scale for the 2014 traveling exhibition Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa.

Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa
2014
Two-artist traveling exhibition in Europe
Carol Bove
Installation view of Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa at Museion, Bolzano, Italy (2014)
Carol Bove
Installation views of Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa at Museion, Bolzano, Italy (2014)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa at Museion, Bolzano, Italy (2014)

The 2014 traveling exhibition Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa brought together works by Bove alongside sculptures, furniture, and exhibition designs by Italian architect Carlo Scarpa. Curated by the Henry Moore Institute and produced in collaboration with Museion and Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, the exhibition considered display strategies, experimentation, and the environment in which art is viewed. Bove herself was closely involved with installation at each venue.

Henry Moore Institute published the accompanying four-language exhibition catalogue with texts by Philippe Duboÿ, Andrea Phillips, and Pavel S. Pyś.

Solo Exhibitions at the High Line and MoMA
2013
Two major concurrent solo exhibitions in New York
Carol Bove
Installation view of The Equinox at The Museum of Modern Art in New York (2013 - 2014)
Carol Bove
Installation view of The Equinox at The Museum of Modern Art in New York (2013 - 2014)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Caterpillar on The High Line at the Rail Yards (2013 - 2014)
Carol Bove
Installation view of Caterpillar on The High Line at the Rail Yards (2013 - 2014)

The Equinox at The Museum of Modern Art and Caterpillar on The High Line at the Rail Yards were each comprised of seven sculptures in specific arrangements created by the artist. The MoMA exhibition displayed works on a raised platform in the museum's painting and sculpture galleries, while the High Line exhibition situated Bove's works among vegetation in a then-unfinished portion of the park.

Each venue demonstrated Bove's interest in the display her work in relation to distinct settings. In her review of the exhibitions in The New York Times, Karen Rosenberg called Bove "an exquisite calibrator of contextual relationships."