A detail from a drawing by Ruth Asawa, titled Sumo Wrestlers, dated 1943.
A detail from a drawing by Ruth Asawa, titled Sumo Wrestlers, dated 1943.
A detail from a drawing by Ruth Asawa, titled Sumo Wrestlers, dated 1943.
Opening this Month
October 1, 2019

October 5, 2019

Accompanying concurrent exhibitions of Roy DeCarava’s work at David Zwirner in New York, Metrograph presents screenings of The Maltese Falcon (1941) and If Beale Street Could Talk (2018)—respectively, a film that inspired DeCarava and one that was inspired by him. Between the two screenings, the first of which will begin at 1:30 PM, will be a conversation between The New Yorker critic Vinson Cunningham and art historian Sherry Turner DeCarava about the artist’s work. 

October 6, 2019–January 26, 2020

A large selection of works by Toba Khedoori will be presented in a group exhibition titled Resonating Spaces at Fondation Beyeler in Basel. Curated by Theodora Vischer and featuring contributions by Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Susan Philipsz, and Rachel Whiteread, the show will bring together works that “evoke spaces between the identifiable and the elusive. They create sites and respites, in which the capacity of remembering is elicited and images and memories come to life.”

October 9 and 10, 2019

On the occasion of the publication of the third and final volume of Luc Tuymans’s Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, edited by Eva Meyer-Hermann and launching in the US in December, the artist will be in conversation with critics and curators at Palazzo Grassi, in Venice, where his solo exhibition La Pelle is on view through January 6, 2020. 

From October 11, 2019

Works by Marcel Dzama will be on view in the group exhibition A Passion for Drawing. The Guerlain Collection from the Centre Pompidou at The Albertina Museum in Vienna. In 2013, Florence and Daniel Guerlain donated some 1,200 works from their drawing-focused collection to the Centre Pompidou; this exhibition at the Albertina, which also includes works by Mark Dion, Catharina van Eetvelde, Robert Longo, Kiki Smith, and Jorinde Voigt, among others, presents highlights from these holdings. 

October 11, 2019–January 5, 2020

Works by Ruth Asawa, who began making art while detained in internment camps for Japanese Americans at Santa Anita, California, and Rohwer, Arkansas, where she was sent with her family in 1942–1943, is included in The Pencil Is a Key: Drawings by Incarcerated Artists at The Drawing Center in New York. Featuring drawings by artists who were or continue to be imprisoned (including those who became artists during their incarceration), the show brings together historical and contemporary works that prove the importance of drawing for those whose lives are restricted. “Before Ruth Asawa became known for her biomorphic wire sculptures,” Hilarie M. Sheets writes in a preview for The New York Times, “she and her family were part of the United States government’s mass internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.”

October 12, 2019–January 30, 2020

Starting October 12, visitors to ICA Miami will be able to visit Yayoi Kusama’s 2016 Infinity Mirror Room, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins. “The first time I ever saw a pumpkin was when I was in elementary school and went with my grandfather to visit a big seed-harvesting ground,” the artist writes in her autobiography; “It seems that pumpkins do not inspire much respect. But I was enchanted by their charming and winsome form. What appealed to me most was the pumpkin’s generous unpretentiousness. That and its solid spiritual balance.” 

October 14–October 21, 2019

Yayoi Kusama has created a new sculptural work for FIAC’s annual Hors les Murs project series. Installed in the Place Vendôme, Life of the Pumpkin Recites, All About the Biggest Love for the People (2019) expands on several of the artist’s best-known motifs: the pumpkin, the polka dot and the inflatable.

October 16, 2019–January 12, 2020

A solo exhibition by Neo Rauch at Palazzo Pitti in Florence takes in works from 2006 to the present and marks the artist’s first museum exhibition in Italy. The show is being curated by art historian Max Seidel and Serena Calamai.

October 18 and 19, 2019

Two events celebrate the new publication Donald Judd Interviews—featuring sixty interviews conducted with the artist in conversation with artists, critics, curators, and other contemporaries over the course of four decades. On October 18, New York’s Metrograph cinema, Judd Foundation, and David Zwirner Books present a screening of Michael Blackwood’s 1972 documentary film, The Artist's Studio: Donald Judd. The following day, Judd foundation will host a marathon reading in partnership with David Zwirner Books and Independent Curators International. ​ICI Collaborators who will read from the book include Barbara London, Juliana Steiner, and Sally Tallant. 

October 23, 2019–January 26, 2020

Bridget Riley travels from the Scottish National Gallery to the Hayward Gallery in London. This critically acclaimed survey presents more than seventy years of work demonstrating the artist’s dedication to the interaction of form and color and its influence on human perception; as Riley wrote in an essay titled “The Pleasures of Sight” in 1984, which is reprinted in the catalogue for this exhibition, “Long before I ever saw a major painting … I had been fortunate enough to discover what ‘looking’ can be—sometimes in a mere glance one can see more than in the close scrutiny of a thousand details.… I discovered that I was painting in order to ‘make visible.’”

October 26, 2019

On Saturday, October 26 at 3 PM, before the exhibition closes, Sherry Turner DeCarava will give a free public walkthrough and book signing of Roy DeCarava: Light Break at 533 West 19th Street.  

Cover image: Ruth Asawa, Sumo Wrestlers, 1943 (detail)