Donald Judd, Artworks: 1970–1994 | David Zwirner
A detail from an untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1982.

Donald Judd

Artworks: 1970–1994

David Zwirner is pleased to announce Artworks: 1970–1994, a survey exhibition devoted to Donald Judd that will be on view across all three of the gallery’s West 19th Street locations in New York. Presented concurrently with The Museum of Modern Art’s full-scale retrospective, this exhibition will focus on a selection of works within Judd’s oeuvre drawn from both public and private collections.


With the intention of creating straightforward work without recourse to grand philosophical statements, Judd eschewed the classical ideals of representational sculpture to create a rigorous visual vocabulary that defines objects as its primary mode of articulation. The unaffected, direct quality of his work demonstrates Judd’s strong interest in color, form, material, and space, thus establishing him as one of the most significant American artists of the postwar period.

 

Read more

Image: Donald Judd, Untitled, 1982 (detail)


The galleries are open to the public with a limited number of visitors allowed into the exhibition spaces at a time, in accordance with city guidelines.


To schedule your visit, please click here.

To learn more about the enhanced safety measures currently in place at this location and others, please click here.

Dates
November 5December 12, 2020
Curators
Flavin Judd
Artist

 “I think that the work implies beyond itself that it’s a relatively chaotic and random world; it just happens to be that I want to order my own particular part of it.”

—Donald Judd, in an interview with Michael Archer for Audio Arts, March 1986

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1986

Donald Judd, untitled, 1986

Untitled, 1986 is one of Judd's largest and most complex installations. Comprising thirty wall-mounted plywood boxes with varying colors of acrylic sheet, it is organized according to a complex internal logic. As Marianne Stockebrand notes, “The dividers can predominate in the left, center or right half of the shapes, as if a motif were leaping backwards and forwards over a screen…. This results in a sense of movement and it is as though the boxes will not allow viewers to remain rooted to the spot but compel them to walk along beside them, gazing forwards and backwards to compare the view that changes every moment.’’

Art should be new.
Art should be made with the widest knowledge possible.
Art should concern what you really know.
Art should resist all received information aesthetic or
otherwise.
Visual art should be visual.
There should be no hierarchy: no frame, no pedestal.
There should be no movement; why should a static object
imitate movement?
There should be no division of “form” and “content,” and so
no “pure form.”....

—Donald Judd, “Notes”, 13 December 1986

A detail from an untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1986.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1986 (detail)

Donald Judd, untitled, 1986 (detail)

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1986

Donald Judd, untitled, 1986

“Judd’s work belongs to a distinct tradition of modern sculpture, one in which the boundaries of the medium are intentionally pushed to the limits of understanding.”

—Ann Temkin, “Introduction: The Originality of Donald Judd”, Judd, 2020

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1970.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1970

Donald Judd, untitled, 1970

The earliest work in this exhibition, untitled, 1970 was devised for Judd’s 1970 solo exhibition at Leo Castelli Gallery in New York. Eighteen hot-dipped galvanized iron panels were installed eight inches in front of three walls of Castelli’s front gallery and set directly onto the floor, uniquely engaging the space “sort of like a dado or something in architecture,” the artist later told critic Phyllis Tuchman. Although the initial installation was site responsive, Judd conceived of it as an open system, specifying that the number of panels and width of the panels could be made flexible for future installations so that it could fit into a range of spaces.

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1989.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1989

Donald Judd, untitled, 1989

A detail from an untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1979.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1979 (detail)

Donald Judd, untitled, 1979 (detail)

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1979

Donald Judd, untitled, 1979

The floor work untitled, 1979—one of Judd's earliest efforts in Cor-ten steel—comprises six modular units positioned closely together so as to give the viewer the impression of a single, cohesive whole.

“I’m very meticulous about the logic of my pieces. But you should only consider logic up to a certain point, because, after all, all the interesting stuff is something else.”

—Donald Judd, in an interview with Catherine Millet for Artpress, April, 1987

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

“Color, like material, is what art is made from. It alone is not art.... In the sheet aluminum works I wanted to use more and diverse bright colors than before.

—Donald, Judd, “Some Aspects of Color in General and Red and Black in Particular”, 1993

An untitled work by Donald Judd, dated 1984.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1984

Donald Judd, untitled, 1984

“The boxes, the progressions, and so forth became their own proof of the initial premise of the strength of this innovative form. These Judds created ‘Judd’ as much as Judd created them.”

—Ann Temkin, “Introduction: The Originality of Donald Judd”, 2020

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1988.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1988

Donald Judd, untitled, 1988

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1982.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1982

Donald Judd, untitled, 1982

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1994.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1994

Donald Judd, untitled, 1994

In 1988, with the intention of localizing his production in Marfa, Texas, where he had been living since 1973, Judd opened a workshop in a disused ice factory. By the following year he was able to produce works in Cor-ten steel there. Although he had previously executed a handful of works in this material, Judd began to translate a number of his key free-standing and wall-mounted forms into Cor-ten.

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1990.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1990

Donald Judd, untitled, 1990

An untitled artwork by Donald Judd, dated 1990.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1990 (detail)

Donald Judd, untitled, 1990 (detail)

“The pieces are meant to have a certain amount of chance…. I like it if it’s less controlled…. And this relationship of chance or not chance or how much ordering or not and all that is a view of the world that ordinarily the best art has to have, one way or another.”

—Donald Judd, in an interview with Michael Archer for Audio Arts, March 1986

“A full understanding of Judd’s contribution to the history of modern art continues to unfold. If Judd did not choose predecessors in sculpture to guide him in what he wanted to do, he has proven in various ways just such a predecessor to any number of artists, regardless of apparent relation between his work and theirs.”

—Ann Temkin, “Introduction: The Originality of Donald Judd”, 2020

An installation view of an exhibition titled Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, at David Zwirner, New York, in 2020.

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

Installation view, Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994, David Zwirner, New York, 2020

An untitled clear anodized aluminum and green acrylic sheets sculpture comprised of six units by Donald Judd, dated 1988.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1988
Clear anodized aluminum and green acrylic sheets
6 units, each: 19 3/4 x 39 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches 
50 x 100 x 50 cm
An untitled douglas fir plywood and acrylic sheets comprised of thirty units by Donald Judd, dated 1986.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1986

Douglas fir plywood and acrylic sheets
63 units, 30 units fabricated, 1986–1988

Each unit: 100 x 100 x 50 cm
39 5/16 x 39 5/16 x 19 5/8 inches

 An untitled clear and colored anodized aluminum sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1990.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1990
Clear and colored anodized aluminum
11 3/4 x 84 3/4 x 11 1/4 inches
29.8 x 215.3 x 28.6 cm
An untitled cadmium red light acrylic on plywood sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1990.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1990
Cadmium red light acrylic on plywood
19 1/2 x 30 1/2 x 45 inches
49.5 x 77.5 x 114.3 cm
An untitled chartreuse acrylic on plywood with square aluminum tube sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1986.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1986
Chartreuse acrylic on plywood with square aluminum tube
16 1/2 x 69 x 5 inches
41.9 x 175.3 x 12.7 cm
An untitled douglas fir plywood sculpture comprised of two units by Donald Judd, dated 1984.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1984
Douglas fir plywood
2 units, each: 39 x 39 x 13 1/8 inches
99.1 x 99.1 x 33.3 cm
An untitled aluminum and red acrylic sheet sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1984.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1984
Aluminum and red acrylic sheet
10 x 70 x 10 inches
25.4 x 177.8 x 25.4 cm
Two untitled recesses in a wall, with galvanized iron in the back of the recesses by Donald Judd, dated 1992.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1992
Two (2) recesses in a wall, with galvanized iron in the back of the recesses
Each recess: 19 5/8 x 29 1/2 x 9 7/8 inches
50 x 75 x 25 cm
An untitled painted aluminum sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1987.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1987
Painted aluminum
2 units, each: 11 7/8 x 141 3/4 x 11 7/8 inches
30 x 360 x 30 cm
An untitled brushed aluminum and yellow over blue acrylic sheet sculpture comprised of four units by Donald Judd, dated 1982.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1982
Brushed aluminum and yellow over blue acrylic sheets
4 units, each 39 3/8 x 39 3/8 x 9 7/8 inches
100 x 100 x 25 cm
A Cor-ten steel sculpture comprised of six units by Donald Judd, dated 1979.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1979
Cor-ten steel

6 units, each 48 x 119 x 14 inches
121.9 x 302.3 x 35.6 cm

An untitled copper sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1973.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1973
Copper
10 x 72 x 26 inches
25.4 x 182.9 x 66 cm
An untitled mill aluminum sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1984.

Donald Judd

Untitled,

1984

Mill aluminum
10 x 60 x 10 inches
25.4 x 152.4 x 25.4 cm
An untitled painted aluminum sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1989.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1989
Painted aluminum
11 3/4 x 118 1/8 x 11 3/4 inches
30 x 300 x 30 cm
An untitled aluminum and purple acrylic sheets sculpture in three units by Donald Judd, dated 1982.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1982
Aluminum and purple acrylic sheets
3 units, each: 39 3/8 x 39 3/8 x 14 5/8 inches
100 x 100 x 37 cm
An untitled Cor-ten steel and black acrylic sheets sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1994.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1994
Cor-ten steel and black acrylic sheets
6 units, each: 9 7/8 x 39 3/8 x 9 7/8 inches
25 x 100 x 25 cm
An untitled blue anodized aluminum sculpture in six units by Donald Judd, dated 1973.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1973
Blue anodized aluminum
Six units
1 unit: 7 7/8 x 15 11/16 x 13 3/4 inches (20 x 40 x 35 cm)
1 unit: 7 7/8 x 10 3/8 x 13 3/4 inches (20 x 26.4 x 35 cm)
1 unit: 7 7/8 x 9 3/8 x 13 3/4 inches (20 x 24 x 35 cm)
3 units, each 7 7/8 x 7 7/8 x 13 3/4 inches (20 x 20 x 35 cm)
An untitled galvanized iron sculpture by Donald Judd, dated 1970.

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1970
Galvanized iron
Length and placement variable

    Read More Read Less

      Read More Read Less

          Artworks: 1970–1994

          Donald Judd

            Inquire

            To learn more about this artwork, please provide your contact information.

            By sharing your details you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. This site is
            also protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

            Inquire

            To learn more about available works, please provide your contact information

            By sharing your details you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions.This site is also
            protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

            • Donald Judd Artworks: 1970–1994
              Explore
              Installation Views
              Checklist